Skip to Content

My.Army.Mil. Learn more about your Army media. How you like it.

Fort Hood Press Center

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Press Center

Get the Latest Updates

Featured News

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – All Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center’s primary care clinics have earned National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) recognition as Patient Centered Medical Homes. Internal Medicine, TMC-12, Pediatrics and Monroe are the most recent CRDAMC primary care clinics to join the ranks. Earlier this year, Thomas Moore, Bennett, Russell Collier, and Family Medicine Residency Center received the highest level of recognition after twelve months of preparation.    

    The NCQA is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving health care quality. Since its founding in 1990, NCQA has been a central figure in driving health improvement throughout the healthcare system. As part of the recognition process, NCQA reviewed hundreds of documents submitted by the staff at each of these clinics which provided fact-based evidence that the clinic was conducting business as a true Medical Home.

    The NCQA measures the ability of medical facilities to provide quality healthcare through standardized, objective measurement guidelines. NCQA requires recognized facilities to enhance access to care and patients' continuity with their provider teams, keep track of patient data to help manage patients' wellbeing, plan and manage care using evidence-based practices, provide self-care support and community resources, as well as track and coordinate tests, referrals and other care for patients. Finally, clinics have to show that they measure their performance and patients' feedback to continue improving the quality of care.

     In 2012, CRDAMC’s three Community Based Medical Homes received similar recognition.

    Army Medicine’s goal is to have all of its primary care facilities in the continental United States and overseas achieve NCQA recognition and transform to the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model of care no later than October 1, 2014. The transition to the PCMH model of care is part of Army Medicine’s overall shift from a health care system to a system for health.

    Here’s what patients can expect from the certified Patient Centered Medical Homes:

    • A personal provider. Each patient has an ongoing relationship with a personal Physician, Physician Assistant or Nurse Practitioner who is trained to provide first contact, continuous and comprehensive care.
    • Physician directed medical practice. The personal physician leads a team(s) of individuals at the practice level who collectively take responsibility for ongoing patient care.
    • Whole person orientation. The personal provider is responsible for providing all of the patient’s health care needs or for arranging care with other qualified professionals.
    • Coordinated and Integrated Care. Each patient’s care is coordinated and integrated across all elements of the health care system and the patient’s community.
    • Quality and Safety focus: All members of the healthcare team are focused on ensuring high quality care in the medical home.
    • Improved access: In the PCMH, enhanced access to care options are available through open scheduling, same day appointments, secure messaging, and other innovative options for communication between patients, their personal physician and practice staff.

     

    –30 –

Headlines

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – All Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center’s primary care clinics have earned National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) recognition as Patient Centered Medical Homes. Internal Medicine, TMC-12, Pediatrics and Monroe are the most recent CRDAMC primary care clinics to join the ranks. Earlier this year, Thomas Moore, Bennett, Russell Collier, and Family Medicine Residency Center received the highest level of recognition after twelve months of preparation.    

    The NCQA is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving health care quality. Since its founding in 1990, NCQA has been a central figure in driving health improvement throughout the healthcare system. As part of the recognition process, NCQA reviewed hundreds of documents submitted by the staff at each of these clinics which provided fact-based evidence that the clinic was conducting business as a true Medical Home.

    The NCQA measures the ability of medical facilities to provide quality healthcare through standardized, objective measurement guidelines. NCQA requires recognized facilities to enhance access to care and patients' continuity with their provider teams, keep track of patient data to help manage patients' wellbeing, plan and manage care using evidence-based practices, provide self-care support and community resources, as well as track and coordinate tests, referrals and other care for patients. Finally, clinics have to show that they measure their performance and patients' feedback to continue improving the quality of care.

     In 2012, CRDAMC’s three Community Based Medical Homes received similar recognition.

    Army Medicine’s goal is to have all of its primary care facilities in the continental United States and overseas achieve NCQA recognition and transform to the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model of care no later than October 1, 2014. The transition to the PCMH model of care is part of Army Medicine’s overall shift from a health care system to a system for health.

    Here’s what patients can expect from the certified Patient Centered Medical Homes:

    • A personal provider. Each patient has an ongoing relationship with a personal Physician, Physician Assistant or Nurse Practitioner who is trained to provide first contact, continuous and comprehensive care.
    • Physician directed medical practice. The personal physician leads a team(s) of individuals at the practice level who collectively take responsibility for ongoing patient care.
    • Whole person orientation. The personal provider is responsible for providing all of the patient’s health care needs or for arranging care with other qualified professionals.
    • Coordinated and Integrated Care. Each patient’s care is coordinated and integrated across all elements of the health care system and the patient’s community.
    • Quality and Safety focus: All members of the healthcare team are focused on ensuring high quality care in the medical home.
    • Improved access: In the PCMH, enhanced access to care options are available through open scheduling, same day appointments, secure messaging, and other innovative options for communication between patients, their personal physician and practice staff.

     

    –30 –

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and its primary care clinics will modify hours in observance of the Labor Day weekend.  Monroe and TMC-12 will be closed Friday, August 29.  All other clinics will maintain normal operating hours. Beneficiaries may call the Patient Appointment Service at (254) 288 - 8888 to schedule appointments.

    All clinics will be closed Monday, September 1.  The Emergency Department, Labor and Delivery, and inpatient services will remain open for beneficiaries requiring care. Beneficiaries with urgent care needs should report to CRDAMC Emergency Department.

    Darnall and all its clinics will resume normal operating hours on Tuesday, September 2.

    Pharmacies

    Monroe Health Clinic pharmacy will be closed Friday, August 29.  All other pharmacies will maintain normal hours.

    The Main Outpatient and Refill Pharmacy will maintain normal hours on Saturday, August 30.

    All CRDAMC pharmacies will be closed on Sunday, August 31.

    The Refill Pharmacy located at Clear Creek PX, will be open Monday, September 1, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.  All other pharmacies will be closed.

    Nurse Advice Line

    The Nurse Advice Line is available 24 hours a day to provide information on urgent health issues, guidance for non-emergency situations, and instructions for self-care for minor injuries and illnesses and assistance with scheduling appointments.  Tricare beneficiaries may speak to a registered nurse on the nurse advice line by calling 1-800- TRICARE (874-2273) Option 1.   

    –30 –

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – The Fort Hood Veterinary Center (VETCEN) was notified Thursday, Aug. 7, that a dead bat was found on the Fort Hood Golf Course. The bat was given to a wildlife rehab specialist who brought the bat to VETCEN personnel. It was submitted for rabies testing at the Texas Department of Health Services Laboratory which notified the VETCEN of the positive test result.  Fort Hood Veterinary personnel and CRDAMC Preventive Medicine are currently investigating this case for possible exposures.

    According to Dr. John Kuczek, officer in charge of the Fort Hood VETCEN, “If you find a bat in your home or building it is imperative to call a professional to retrieve it and have it tested for rabies.” If you need assistance with retrieving a bat or animal, call the Military Police at (254) 287-4001.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, “The rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. The early symptoms of rabies in people are similar to that of many other illnesses, including fever, headache, and general weakness or discomfort. As the disease progresses, more specific symptoms appear and may include insomnia, anxiety, confusion, slight or partial paralysis, excitation, hallucinations, agitation, hypersalivation (increase in saliva), difficulty swallowing, and hydrophobia (fear of water). Death usually occurs within days of the onset of these symptoms.”

    This is the sixth identified case on Fort Hood since May 12. The first case involved a skunk that was sighted during daylight hours acting strangely in a motor pool on Motorpool Road. The second case, on May 16, involved a dark gray and white kitten that attacked a Fort Hood resident outside a home on Central Drive on post. The third case, June 6, involved a young fox which was thought to be injured when found in the vicinity of the LV Phantom area and building 53905 near Clarke Road. The fourth and fifth cases, July 17 and 28, involved bats found near the Department of Public Works motorpool.

    Public Health Command and the Fort Hood Veterinary Center strongly urge all Fort Hood Soldiers, civilians, contractors and residents to be aware and avoid handling wild or stray animals.

    If you notice any wildlife or stray animals acting abnormally, or displaying neurologic or aggressive behavior, please contact the Military Police at (254) 287-4001. If you believe you have already come into contact with an animal displaying any of these symptoms please go directly to the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Emergency Department for immediate care.

    Get more rabies information by visiting these Web sites: www.cdc.gov/rabies or http://phc.amedd.army.mil/topics/discond/aid/Pages/Rabies.aspx.

    –30 –

  • Assumption of Responsibility

    FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center welcomed Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Brooks to the medical center’s command team in an Assumption of Responsibility ceremony July 25.

    Brooks assumed responsibility from Command Sgt. Maj. Melissa McFrazier, who served as the interim command sergeant major since Command Sgt. Maj. Roger Velarde relinquished responsibility in May of this year.

    Col. Patricia Darnauer, CRDAMC commander, welcomed the newest addition to the command team. “This summer has been a period of significant transitions for us, yet the constant that remains is this medical center’s commitment to serving the Soldiers, families, and beneficiaries of the ‘Great Place’ with trusted care and concern,” she said. “We’ve made significant strides recently meeting our patients’ needs as we transform our business processes and welcome the opportunities the new hospital rising behind me presents.

    “I challenge you, Command Sgt. Maj. Brooks, and every member of the CRDAMC team, to rise to the challenge to take advantage of the opportunity a new state-of-the-art building with the many new and emerging design elements and medical technologies offers us.”

    Brooks thanked everyone for coming and showing their support.

    “I am excited about being at the ‘Great Place.’ It’s a privilege to serve as a command sergeant major and I’m honored to serve as the command sergeant major for CRDAMC,” he said.  “Colonel Darnauer, I’m eager to forge our relationship. I look forward to discovering how I can be a valuable contributor to the CRDAMC team.”

    Before coming to CRDAMC, Brooks was the command sergeant major at Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, N.C.

     

    – 30 –

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – The Fort Hood Veterinary Center (VETCEN) was notified Monday, July 28, that a bat found near the Department of Public Works motorpool, building 4001, tested positive for rabies.

    The bat, showing signs consistent with rabies, was humanely euthanized and submitted for rabies testing at the Texas Department of Health Services Laboratory.  Fort Hood Veterinary personnel and Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Preventive Medicine are currently investigating this case for possible exposures.

    According to Dr. John Kuczek, officer in charge of the Fort Hood VETCEN, “If you find a bat in your home or building it is imperative to call a professional to retrieve it and have it tested for rabies.” If you need assistance with retrieving a bat or animal, call the Military Police at (254) 287 – 4001. Kuczek noted, “Sometimes people will shoo the bat out of the house not thinking about getting it tested.”  Kuczek also noted, “Children, sleeping adults and intoxicated individuals may not know they have been bitten as bat bites are often not severe enough to see or feel.”  Therefore, it is important to know the signs and symptoms associated with rabies and seek care if you suspect exposure.  

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, “the rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. The early symptoms of rabies in people are similar to that of many other illnesses, including fever, headache, and general weakness or discomfort. As the disease progresses, more specific symptoms appear and may include insomnia, anxiety, confusion, slight or partial paralysis, excitation, hallucinations, agitation, hypersalivation (increase in saliva), difficulty swallowing, and hydrophobia (fear of water). Death usually occurs within days of the onset of these symptoms.”

    This is the fifth identified case on Fort Hood since May 12. The first case involved a skunk that was sighted during daylight hours acting strangely in a motor pool on Motorpool Road. The second case, on May 16, involved a dark gray and white kitten that attacked a Fort Hood resident outside a home on Central Drive on post. The third case, on June 6, involved a young fox which was thought to be injured when found in the vicinity of the LV Phantom area and building 53905 near Clarke Road. The fourth case also involved a bat found near the DPW motorpool.

    Public Health Command and the Fort Hood Veterinary Center strongly urge all Fort Hood Soldiers, civilians, contractors and residents to be aware and avoid handling wild or stray animals.

    If you notice any wildlife or stray animals acting abnormally, or displaying neurologic or aggressive behavior, please contact the Military Police at (254) 287-4001. If you believe you have already come into contact with an animal displaying any of these symptoms please go directly to the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Emergency Department for immediate care.

    Get more rabies information by visiting these Web sites: www.cdc.gov/rabies or http://phc.amedd.army.mil/topics/discond/aid/Pages/Rabies.aspx.

     

     

    –30 –

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – The Fort Hood Veterinary Center (VETCEN) was notified Thursday, July 17, that a bat found in the vicinity of the Department of Public Works motorpool, building 4001, tested positive for rabies.

    The bat was given to a wildlife rehab specialist who brought the bat to the Fort Hood VETCEN.  The bat was humanely euthanized and submitted for rabies testing at the Texas Department of Health Services Laboratory. 

    This is the fourth identified case on Fort Hood since May 12. The first case involved a skunk that was sighted during daylight hours acting strangely in a motor pool on Motorpool Road. The second case, on May 16, involved a dark gray and white kitten that attacked a Fort Hood resident outside a home on Central Drive on post. The third case, on June 6, involved a young fox which was thought to be injured when found in the vicinity of the LV Phantom area and building 53905 near Clarke Road.

    Public Health Command and the Fort Hood Veterinary Center strongly urge all Fort Hood Soldiers, civilians, contractors and residents to be aware and avoid handling wild or stray animals.

    If you notice any wildlife or stray animals acting abnormally, or displaying neurologic or aggressive behavior please contact the Military Police at (254) 287-4001. If you believe you have already come into contact with an animal displaying any of these symptoms please go directly to the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Emergency Department for immediate care.

    “If you or your pets make contact with a stray animal or wildlife, contact your local veterinarian or health care provider immediately. Rabies is a deadly disease and currently present in this area. Please remain diligent for the health and safety of you and your family,” Dr. John Kuczek, officer in charge of the Fort Hood VETCEN said.

    An animal that is infected with rabies may not show any signs or symptoms until late in the disease, often just days before its death. The animal can, however, still spread the deadly virus while appearing completely normal.

    The rabies virus is transmitted to humans by the saliva of infected animals through bite wounds, contact with mucous membranes or broken skin. Humans can become infected and harbor the virus for weeks to months, and in extremely rare cases, years before becoming ill. During this incubation period, which averages between one and three months, rabies can be prevented with appropriate treatment, including a series of vaccinations. Once symptoms occur, however, death is almost always certain.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, “the rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. The early symptoms of rabies in people are similar to that of many other illnesses, including fever, headache, and general weakness or discomfort. As the disease progresses, more specific symptoms appear and may include insomnia, anxiety, confusion, slight or partial paralysis, excitation, hallucinations, agitation, hypersalivation (increase in saliva), difficulty swallowing, and hydrophobia (fear of water). Death usually occurs within days of the onset of these symptoms.”

    Get more rabies information by visiting these Web sites: www.cdc.gov/rabies or http://phc.amedd.army.mil/topics/discond/aid/Pages/Rabies.aspx.

  • FORT HOOD, Texas –Fort Hood and the surrounding community remain under Stage 4 Water Conservation to include Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center.  The hospital continues to provide care to beneficiaries; however, some services were reduced today in order to minimize water usage.

    In response conservation efforts, outpatient services on Fort Hood and at the Copperas Cove CBMHs were suspended affecting several thousand patient appointments.   Of those appointments, some patients were seen in other facilities while others were rescheduled.  Beneficiaries still affected by the closures can reschedule appointments by calling 254- 288-8888. 

    Killeen and Harker Heights CBMHs remained open.  Additional staff members were sent to increase the capacity of the medical homes and support overflow from Copperas Cove and Fort Hood medical home closures.   

    Surgeries were and continue to be handled on a case-by-case basis.  Patients scheduled for procedures can expect to receive instructions directly from a member of their care team.

    Currently, the second and third floors of CRDAMC are experiencing low to no pressure; however, measures are being taken to ensure adequate water supply is provided for those areas.  CRDAMC patients and staff have access to several thousand bottles of water provided by Logistics as well as 1700 bottles provided by the Red Cross.  Additionally, portable toilets and hand washing stations have been deployed near the medical center. 

    Emergency Department, Inpatient Services, Pharmacy, Lab, Radiology, and Patient Appointment Service continue to operate normally.  In light of the continued conservation measures, the staff and community managed the changes well.  CRDAMC continues to provide quality, patient –centered care to the Soldiers, Families, and veterans of “The Great Place.”

    Fort Hood PAO recently released Bell Country Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 reports that the main water line is repaired.  Fort Hood Officials anticipate water pressure will return to normal tomorrow morning.  Beneficiaries are encouraged to check www.facebook.com/crdamc or www.forthoodpresscenter.com for updates.

    Questions regarding this release should be directed to the CRDAMC Public Affairs Office at (254) 288-8005.

     – 30 –

  • Tara and Spc. David Potter hold their three three girls (from left) Harlee Quinn, Virginia Ann and Chloeann Odette who were born at Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center June 30.(U.S. Army photo by Patricia Deal, CRDAMC Public Affairs)

     

    By Patricia Deal CRDAMC Public Affairs

     

    FORT HOOD, Texas—Three teeny, little girls created a big fuss at Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center here June 30.

    Harlee Quinn, Chloeann Odette and Virginia Ann Potter made their debut early in the morning, earning them the distinction of being the first set of triplets born at CRDAMC in the last five years.

    The girls are the first children for Spc. David Potter and his wife Tara, both 23 years old. The girls were born by Caesarian section at 34 weeks, weighing in at just over four pounds each. Babies and Mom are all doing well, with the girls staying in the neonatal intensive care unit at CRDAMC as is typical for multiple-birth newborns.

    The Potters are already hard at work setting up a routine taking turns caring for the girls--feeding, changing, cuddling--and how to identify each one. Potter said they are not identical so it's a bit easier, and they are each starting to show their own personalities.

    Potter, an all-wheel mechanic with 1st Cavalry Division, and Tara have been at Fort Hood only for a few months. Tara said she knew she was having triplets from the start, having to use fertility treatments to conceive. While both parents have twins in their families, this is the first set of triplets.

    "We were surprised at first, as it is daunting to think about having multiple babies to take care of all at once. But we're just so happy to have them no matter how many there are. It's exciting. They're healthy and beautiful and that's all that matters," she said.

    Dad agrees, but said he is thinking about how life is going to be raising three girls the same age. "I'm already thinking about proms, college, weddings," he said, "and those first dates. Yes, I will be prepared."

    CRDAMC's labor and delivery unit is one of the busiest in the Army, averaging approximately eight births per day. In recent months, the staff has seen a jump in those numbers with one record-setting day seeing 13 births, according to the Chief of Maternal Child Health.

    --30—

  • MSC 97th Anniversary Cake Cutting

    FORT HOOD, Texas--Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center celebrated the U.S. Army Medical Service Corps (MSC) 97th anniversary with a traditional cake cutting ceremony here June 30.

    The Medical Service Corps is comprised of a wide diversity of medical administrative, scientific, and provider specialties ranging from the management and support of the Army's health services system to direct patient care. Administrative officers manage various aspects of Combat Health Support and the allied science officers directly impact the health of the Soldiers and their families.

    In her opening remarks, CRDAMC Commander, Col. Patricia Darnauer, a Medical Service Corps officer commissioned in 1986, acknowledged the vital role MSC officers play in Army medicine.  “Ninety-seven years of valued service and support is an achievement we can all be proud of,” she said. “Medical Service Corps officers today are the most professional and experienced in Army medicine and continue the proud tradition of providing the world's finest Combat Casualty Care ensuring we have a Ready and Healthy Force and Healthy Families and Retirees.”

    The 1st Medical Brigade Commander, Col. Allan Darden, Sr., an MSC officer since 1988, was the keynote speaker. “Never forget as we celebrate today our history and the part you are playing as it continues to be written,” he said. “Never forget our brothers and sisters who have given the ultimate sacrifice wearing the Silver Caduceus.”

    2nd Lt. Jessica Growney and Maj. Ellis Moffett, the youngest and oldest Soldiers respectively out of the more than 60 MSC officers currently at CRDAMC, cut the cake to serve attendees.

    Although the MSC was established Aug. 4, 1947, consolidating the Sanitary Corps, Medical Administrative Corps and Pharmacy Corps into one permanent Army Corps, the MSC celebrates the anniversary of its corps as June 30, 1917. According to “The History of the U.S. Army Medical Service Corps,” precursors such as Revolutionary War apothecaries and officers of the Civil War Ambulance Corps evolved into the World War I Sanitary Corps which was established on June 30, 1917, as a temporary part of the Medical Department based on authority provided by an act of Congress.

                                                                       --30--

     

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and its primary care clinics will modify operating hours in observance of the 4th of July Federal holiday. The hospital remains open every day for emergency services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

    Primary and Urgent Care Services

    Friday, July 4 – Sunday, July 6

    Thomas Moore, Bennett, Collier, Family Medicine Residency Center, Killeen Medical Home, Copperas Cove Medical Home, Harker Heights Medical Home, the Pediatric Clinic, Monroe Clinic, Troop Medical Clinic 12, Internal Medicine Clinic and Patient Appointment Service are closed Friday through Sunday (July 4 – 7).

    During the holiday period, TRICARE Prime enrollees with urgent or emergent care needs should go to the Emergency Department for immediate care.

    Monday, July 7

    Thomas Moore Health Clinic will be open from 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. All active-duty Soldiers and TRICARE Prime enrollees assigned to Thomas Moore, Bennett, Collier, Family Medicine Residency Center, Killeen Medical Home, Copperas Cove Medical Home, Harker Heights Medical Home, Pediatrics, Monroe Clinic and Troop Medical Clinic 12 can receive care at Thomas Moore Health Clinic on that day.

    The Patient Appointment Service, (254) 288-8888, will also be open from 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Monday.

    Pharmacies

    Friday, July 4

    All CRDAMC pharmacies will be closed.

    Saturday, July 5

    The Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, will be open from 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. for new medical treatment facility prescriptions only. The Refill Pharmacy, located at the Clear Creek PX, will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. All other pharmacies will be closed.

    Sunday, July 6

    All CRDAMC pharmacies will be closed.

    Monday, July 7

    CRDAMC’s Main Outpatient Pharmacy will be open 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. and the Thomas Moore Health Clinic Pharmacy will be open from 7 a.m. – 5 p.m. The Refill Pharmacy, located in the Clear Creek PX, will be open from 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

    Nurse Advice Line

    Darnall’s Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (254) 553-3695. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area who are entitled to military healthcare may talk to registered nurses about urgent health issues, guidance on non-emergency situations, and information about self-care for injuries or illnesses.

    The hospital and all Medical Center clinics and pharmacies will return to normal operating hours on Tuesday, July 8.

    – 30 –

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center will honor 14 graduates from four residency, fellowship, and graduate-level programs at Club Hood Friday, June 20, at 1 p.m..

    Maj. Gen. Brian C. Lein, Deputy Surgeon General/Deputy Commanding General, Operations U.S. Army Medical Command, is the guest speaker.

    The four programs honoring graduates include the Emergency Medicine Residency Program (EMRP), Family Medicine Residency Program (FMRP), Family Medicine Obstetric Fellowship Program (FMOFP) and the U.S. Army-Baylor University Graduate Program in Health and Business Administration.

    Each program includes rigorous training that takes one to three years to complete. Both the EMRP and the FMRP are required residencies for doctors to be eligible for board certification in their respective fields. The FMOF augments obstetric care skills in order to facilitate safer deliveries for patients and the Health and Business Administration Program allows tomorrow’s Army Medicine leaders to gain invaluable hands-on knowledge and experience on how a medical facility operates.

    Media interested in covering this event should register here by 5p.m. June 19.  Gate time for media is 12:15 p.m. June 20 at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center. 

    For questions or more information, media may contact Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office by calling (254) 288-8005 or (254) 286-7954.

    – 30 –

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Government, military and community leaders will participate in a groundbreaking ceremony for a new $11 million center that will provide care and services for Wounded Warriors at Fort Hood.

    Texas Gov. Rick Perry will join Lt Gen. Mark A. Milley, Commanding General, III Corps and Fort Hood along with representatives from the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund to ceremonially mark the spot that will become the home of the Fort Hood Intrepid Spirit Center of Excellence. The ceremony is scheduled for Thursday, 12 June at 2:00 p.m. at Fort Hood.

    The Fort Hood Intrepid Spirit Center is the fifth of nine planned facilities across the country. When completed, the Intrepid Spirit Center will provide services to military members with complex medical conditions including Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Behavioral Health (BH), chronic pain and other related ailments. 

    Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund leadership representatives will be available for interviews following the groundbreaking.

    Media interested in covering this event should register here by 5p.m. June 11. Gate time for media is 1:15p.m. June 12 at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center.

    For questions or more information, media may contact Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office at calling (254) 288-8005 or (254) 286-7954.

    – 30 –

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – The Fort Hood Veterinary Center (VETCEN) was notified today, Friday, June 6, that a young fox found in the vicinity of the LV Phantom area and building 53905 near Clarke Road tested positive to rabies. 

    The fox, which was thought to be injured when found, was brought to the Fort Hood VETCEN where it began showing clinical signs consistent with rabies.  After it was humanely euthanized it was submitted to the Texas Department of Health Services for testing. 

    This is the third identified case on Fort Hood since May 12. The first case involved a skunk that was sighted during daylight hours acting strangely in a motor pool on Motorpool Road. The second case, on May 16, involved a dark gray and white kitten that attacked a Fort Hood resident outside a home on Central Drive on post. 

    Public Health Command and the Fort Hood Veterinary Center strongly urge all Fort Hood Soldiers, civilians, contractors and residents to be aware and avoid handling wild or stray animals.

    If you notice any wildlife or stray animals acting abnormally, or displaying neurologic or aggressive behavior please contact the Military Police at (254) 287-4001. If you believe you have already come into contact with an animal displaying any of these symptoms please go directly to the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Emergency Department for immediate care.

    “If you or your pets make contact with a stray animal or wildlife, contact your local veterinarian or health care provider immediately. Rabies is a deadly disease and currently present in this area.  Please remain diligent for the health and safety of you and your family,” Dr. John Kuczek, officer in charge of the Fort Hood VETCEN said.    

    An animal that is infected with rabies may not show any signs or symptoms until late in the disease, often just days before its death. The animal can, however, still spread the deadly virus while appearing completely normal.

    The rabies virus is transmitted to humans by the saliva of infected animals through bite wounds, contact with mucous membranes or broken skin.  Humans can become infected and harbor the virus for weeks to months, and in extremely rare cases, years before becoming ill. During this incubation period, which averages between one and three months, rabies can be prevented with appropriate treatment, including a series of vaccinations. Once symptoms occur, however, death is almost always certain.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, “the rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. The early symptoms of rabies in people are similar to that of many other illnesses, including fever, headache, and general weakness or discomfort. As the disease progresses, more specific symptoms appear and may include insomnia, anxiety, confusion, slight or partial paralysis, excitation, hallucinations, agitation, hypersalivation (increase in saliva), difficulty swallowing, and hydrophobia (fear of water). Death usually occurs within days of the onset of these symptoms.”

    Get more rabies information by visiting these Web sites: www.cdc.gov/rabies or http://phc.amedd.army.mil/topics/discond/aid/Pages/Rabies.aspx.

     

     

    – 30 –

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Within the last week two separate cases of rabies have been identified on post by the Fort Hood Veterinary Center, resulting in one confirmed human exposure requiring treatment.

    The first identified case occurred May 12 and involved a skunk that was sighted during daylight hours acting strangely in a motor pool on Motorpool Road. The second case, on May 16, involved a dark gray and white kitten that attacked a Fort Hood resident outside a home on Central Drive on post. 

    “At this time, there is one confirmed exposure and the victim has started post exposure rabies prophylaxis,” Dr. John Kuczek, the officer in charge of the Fort Hood Veterinary Center said.

    As a result of these instances, Public Health Command and the Fort Hood Veterinary Center strongly urge all residents to be aware and avoid handling wild or stray animals, and ensure their pets are properly vaccinated for rabies. 

    “The importance of receiving appropriate medical evaluation following contact with a feral/stray animal cannot be overstated,” Kuczek said. “If you or your pets had contact with either of these cases, please contact your local veterinarian or health care provider immediately.” 

    An animal that is infected with rabies may not show any signs or symptoms until late in the disease, often just days before its death. The animal can, however, still spread the deadly virus while appearing completely normal.

    The rabies virus is transmitted to humans by the saliva of infected animals through bite wounds, contact with mucous membranes or broken skin.  Humans can become infected and harbor the virus for weeks to months, and in extremely rare cases, years before becoming ill. During this incubation period, which averages between one and three months, rabies can be prevented with appropriate treatment, including a series of vaccinations. Once symptoms occur, however, death is almost always certain.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, “the rabies virus infects the central nervous system, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. The early symptoms of rabies in people are similar to that of many other illnesses, including fever, headache, and general weakness or discomfort. As the disease progresses, more specific symptoms appear and may include insomnia, anxiety, confusion, slight or partial paralysis, excitation, hallucinations, agitation, hypersalivation (increase in saliva), difficulty swallowing, and hydrophobia (fear of water). Death usually occurs within days of the onset of these symptoms.”

    Get more rabies information by visiting these Web sites: www.cdc.gov/rabies or http://phc.amedd.army.mil/topics/discond/aid/Pages/Rabies.aspx.

    – 30 –

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and its primary care clinics will modify operating hours in observance of the Memorial Day Federal holiday.  The hospital remains open every day for emergency, labor and delivery, and inpatient care services.

    Primary and Urgent Care Services

    Bennett, Collier, Family Medicine Residency Center, Killeen Medical Home, Copperas Cove Medical Home, Harker Heights Medical Home, the Pediatric Clinic, the Troop Medical Clinics and Internal Medicine Clinic will be closed Friday through Monday (May 23 – 26).

    All active-duty Soldiers and TRICARE Prime enrollees assigned to Thomas Moore, Bennett, Collier, Family Medicine Residency Center, Killeen Medical Home, Copperas Cove Medical Home, Harker Heights Medical Home, Pediatrics, and the Troop Medical Clinics can receive care at Thomas Moore Health Clinic on Friday, May 23, from 7a.m. – 5p.m.  Thomas Moore Clinic will be closed Saturday through Monday (May 24 – 26).

    TRICARE Prime enrollees with urgent or emergent care needs should seek assistance at the CRDAMC Emergency Department.

    The Patient Appointment Service, (254) 288-8888, is open from 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Friday, May 23.  The Patient Appointment Service will be closed Saturday, Sunday and Monday (May 24 -26). 

    Darnall, its clinics and the Patient Appointment Service will resume normal operating hours on Tuesday, May 27.

    Nurse Advice Line

    Darnall’s Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (254) 553-3695. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area entitled to military healthcare may speak with registered nurses about urgent health issues, guidance on non-emergency situations, and information about self-care for injuries or illnesses.

    Pharmacies

    Friday, May 23

    CRDAMC’s Main Outpatient Pharmacy and the Thomas Moore Health Clinic Pharmacy will be open from 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. The Refill Pharmacy, located in the Clear Creek PX, will open from 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

    Saturday, May 24

    The Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, will be open from 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. for new medical treatment facility prescriptions only. The Refill Pharmacy, located at the Clear Creek PX, will open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. All other pharmacies will be closed.

    Sunday, May 25

    All CRDAMC pharmacies will be closed.

    Monday, May 26

    The Refill Pharmacy, located at the Clear Creek PX, will open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. All other pharmacies will be closed.

    All CRDAMC pharmacies return to normal operating hours on Tuesday, May 27.

    – 30 –

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center’s Behavioral Health Department will celebrate National Mental Health Awareness Month with a Behavioral Health Information Fair Monday, May 19, from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. at Spirit of Fort Hood Chapel.

    This event is free and open to the public. Many behavioral health resources from Fort Hood and the local communities will be available to highlight services.

    Live demonstrations will be held throughout the day on guided imagery, bio-feedback, massage, skin therapy, Acudetox, yoga and more. There will also be several booths presenting information and assistance on topics like depression, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress, alcohol and substance abuse, mental illness, coping skills, self-care and wellness, suicide and community support.

    Topics of discussion will include Warrior resiliency, grief and bereavement, domestic violence, trauma; mind, body and spirit and more.

    Additionally, the Department of Behavioral Health would like to invite active duty, DOD civilian, contractor, and community providers to the 3rd annual CEU Workshop event May 28 –29 from 12:30-4:30 p.m. each day at Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center.

    All CEU classes will be held in Classroom B, above the CRDAMC Emergency Department. A schedule for the CEU event follows.

    Wednesday, May 28

    12:30 –1:30 p.m. - Dr. Timothy Ingram, Revisiting Suicidal Ideations: The Elephant's Trunk Is in the Tent or Is It a Ruse?

    1:30 – 2:30 p.m. - Dr. Jerry Wesch, Lessons Learned About PTSD Index Events & Multi-modal PTSD Treatment: The WCSRP Experience1i-editation exercise for providers

    (10 minute mini-meditation session)

    2:40 – 3:30 p.m. - COL Jeff Yarvis, Reintegration

    3:30 – 4:30 p.m. - Brooke Fina, LCSW & Dr. Edward Wright, Prolonged Exposure Therapy Case study

    Thursday, May 29

    12:30 – 1:30 p.m. - 1LT Hannah S. Thomas, MSW, LCSWA, Faith of the American Soldier and the Responsibility of the Behavioral Health Care Provider

    1:30 – 2:30 p.m. - Dr. Kristi Pruiksma and Dr. Karin Nicholson, Sleep Disorders

    (10 minute mini-yoga session)

    2:40 – 3:30 p.m. - Dr. Sylvia Turner, Children and Deployment-Families Overcoming Under Stress (FOCUS) for Early Childhood

    3:30 – 4:30 p.m. - Dr. Patti Resick, Cognitive Processing Therapy

    CEU credits are approved for Social Workers and Psychologists. There is no cost for attendance, but RSVP is requested at https://einvitations.afit.edu/inv/anim.cfm?i=189992&k=03694B007255.

    Media interested in covering the Behavioral Health Information Fair should RSVP with the CRDAMC Public Affairs Office by calling (254) 288-8005 or (254) 286-7954 no later than 5 p.m. May 16, for the meeting time and location.

     – 30 –

     

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center will host its first Obstetric and Gynecologic Nurse Resident (66G) graduation ceremony at the hospital April 28 at 1 p.m.

    Graduates who will be honored at the ceremony are the first to complete the 16-week course since the program was relocated to CRDAMC from Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii in January of this year.

    The course is focused on providing foundational information and skills to prepare Army Nurse Corps officers and Department of Defense Civilian registered nurses to function as advanced beginner staff nurses in a setting which meets the environmental nursing standards for OB/GYN Nursing.

    The 66G course is a stepping stone to develop a specialized field of training into a life-long career, caring for women across the life-span.

    After graduation many students sit for the National Certification Exam for Intra-partum Nursing which additionally grants them the registered nurse certification (RNC) recognition. The RNC qualification is known nationally as a certification process to guarantee a standard of care for nurses practicing in this highly prestigious field.

    Media interested in covering this event should R.S.V.P. with the CRDAMC Public Affairs Office by calling (254) 288-8005 or (254) 286-7954 by 4 p.m. Friday, April 25 for meeting time and location.

    – 30 –

     

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Beginning on or about March 21 – August 2014 road construction in the vicinity of the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center hospital is expected to significantly impact traffic flow especially at the Santa Fe Gate. 

    The Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Provost Marshal’s office recommends all hospital staff members and beneficiaries consider using the main gate for travel to and from work during this period.

    Beginning on or about March 24 – August 2014:  The easterly travel lane on Santa Fe, the lane traveling out of the gate will be closed from 58th Street.  On this road one would travel from the Warrior Transition area out the Santa Fe Gate.  Easterly travel on this road will be allowed in the current turn lane.  Appropriate signage will be posted.  Travel delays can be expected during peak travel times in this area.

    Beginning on or about April 21 - May 30, 2014:  The southerly traveling lane of Wratten Road between Darnall Loop and Santa Fe will be closed allowing for only one-way traffic north.  This is the road one would travel to get from the Women's Health Center or Billy Johnson Dental Clinic to the Fisher House or to leave through the Santa Fe Gate.  During this period the center lane of travel entering from Santa Fe Gate to continue straight on Santa Fe Road will also be closed.  Appropriate signage will be displayed as well as a marked detour route.  Significant travel delays can be expected in this area during peak travel times.

    Beginning on or about June 2 – July 18, 2014: The opposite lane will be closed in the same location allowing only for one-way traffic south.  This of the road one would use to travel form the fisher house or Santa Fe Gate to the Women's Health Center or Billy Johnson Dental Clinic. Appropriate signage will be displayed the detour mentioned above will be reversed.  Significant travel delays can be expected in this area during peak travel times.

    Beginning on or about July 21 – Aug. 19, 2014: Wratten Road in front of the IDES/VA/ASAP buildings will be restricted to one lane of travel.  Appropriate signage will be displayed and flaggers will be used to ensure safe travel.

    The work will take place in several phases.  Please remember construction dates tend to vary. 

    – 30 –

  • FORT HOOD, Texas-- Carl R. Darnall Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Clinic will host its annual open house March 20 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in honor of March’s Brain Injury Awareness Month.

    The “Healing from the Inside” will offer participates opportunities to participate in interactive workshops like yoga, board games and firearms simulators,  as well as listen to TBI clinicians talk about treating and preventing concussions and brain injuries. The purpose of the event is to help people better recognize, respond, and recover if a TBI occurs, as well as learn about the multitude of services available at the clinic, which includes a holistic team of social workers, nurse case managers, neuropsychology specialist, and speech, occupational and physical therapists.

    TBI injuries, which are caused by a blow or bump to the head, disrupt brain functioning and can range from mild. It is estimated that more than 294,000 service members have been diagnosed with a brain injury or concussion since 2000. Although thousands of service members’ brain injuries are combat-related, more than 80 percent occur in garrison and are the result of falls, vehicle and bicycle accidents, sports injuries and assaults, according to the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center.

    Media representatives interested in covering the open house, are asked to be at the Fort Hood visitor’s Center by 10:30 a.m., March 20.

    -30-

  • By Brandy Gill, CRDAMC Public Affairs

    FORT HOOD, Texas – This past week Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center participated in Patient Safety Awareness Week, an event that was founded by the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) and celebrated by healthcare organizations worldwide.

    This annual education and awareness campaign for health care safety highlights the continued need to make both patients and health care professionals aware of the importance of reducing errors in health care.

    Each year, organizations participate by prominently displaying the NPSF campaign logo and promotional materials within their organizations, creating awareness within the community while educating hospital staff and patients.

    According to Lisa Kelly, the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center’s patient safety manager, this year’s theme for National Patient Safety is “Navigate Your Health…Safely.”

    “This is a week to recognize the advancements that have been made in the patient safety arena, while acknowledging the challenges that remain and committing to work on them every day,” Kelly said.

    One of the big focuses this year is on preventing errors in diagnosis which, according to Kelly, requires patients to be active participants in their healthcare.

    “This is a collaborative effort that includes encouraging patients to be assertive and ask questions as well as trust their instincts when it comes to their health. Providers are also encouraged to make patients a partner in the diagnosis process,” she said.

    According to Col. Roger Gallup, the CRDAMC deputy commander for clinical services, efforts to promote this type of working relationship between providers and patients at CRDAMC is also endorsed by the National Patient Safety Foundation.

    “Patients need to be informed and engaged in their care. The National Patient Safety Foundation has an education program that is called "Ask Me 3." It encourages a dialogue between the patient and the provider,” Gallup said. “The three questions are:  what is my main problem, what do I need to do, and why is it important for me to do this. These questions help patients be engaged in their care and take better care of themselves. It also helps improve the outcomes of chronic medical conditions.”

    According to Kelly, CRDAMC has seen success by implementing NPSF techniques.

    “There is still work to be done, but we’ve come a long way, and we’ve come out better because of all the support we receive from all of our staff to ensure that CRDAMC is providing a safe environment for our beneficiaries.”

     – 30 –

    Patient Safety Week 2014 v1

    From left: Triella Stallings, CRDAMC Patient Safety, Col. Roger Gallup, CRDAMC deputy commander of clinical services, and Lisa Kelly, CRDAMC patient safety manager, cut a cake in recognition of National Patient Safety Awareness Week. (Photo by, Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs)

    National Patient Safety Awareness Week 2014 v2

    Lisa Kelly, CRDAMC patient safety manager, and Triella Stallings, CRDAMC patient safety, hand out cake and informational materials to CRDAMC Soldiers and civilian staff as well as beneficiaries. (Photo by: Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs)

    National Patient Safety Awareness Week 2014 v3

    Lisa Kelly, CRDAMC patient safety manager, hands out bags and informational material to CRDAMC staff during Patient Safety Awareness Week. (Photo by: Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs)

  • The Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center is open today, March 4, for normal business operations.

    Normal staff reporting times for all staff apply. If any staff member is unable to report at their normal duty time, they should contact their immediate supervisor.

    Fort Hood DES reports ACP 6 (Santa Fe Gate) is CLOSED. It is unknown at this time when it will reopen.

    Sanding operations are in progress on post bridges and overpasses. Please use caution when reporting to work or appointments.

    -30-

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – TRICARE For Life (TFL) beneficiaries will soon receive letters guiding them to TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery or a military pharmacy for some prescriptions. Home Delivery saves beneficiaries time, transportation costs, costs beneficiaries less, and automatically delivers refills when they are due so forgetting a refill is one less thing to worry about in life. 

    Starting the week of Feb. 18, 2014, TRICARE began sending letters to affected TFL beneficiaries (TFL beneficiaries are those using Medicare) notifying them of the Pilot. Home Delivery and military pharmacies are the two most cost-effective choices for both beneficiaries and the Department of Defense.

    The TFL Pharmacy Pilot started March 15, 2014 and requires TRICARE beneficiaries who use TFL to get certain medications through Home Delivery or at a military pharmacy. The Pilot applies to refills of maintenance medications taken regularly for chronic conditions. As part of the pilot, TRICARE will stop paying for these medications from a retail pharmacy. The Pilot does not apply to medications for acute conditions taken for a limited time, such as antibiotics or pain medications or any generic medications, and at this time does not apply to generic drugs.

    Congress mandated the Pilot in the 2013 National Defense Authorization Act. The Pilot lasts for five years, although beneficiaries may choose to opt out after filling an affected prescription under the Pilot through Home Delivery for one year.

    Beneficiaries will be notified if they are taking a medication covered under the Pilot. They will have two “courtesy fills” available through a retail pharmacy before they are responsible for the entire cost of their medication.

    Beneficiaries may call the TRICARE pharmacy contractor, Express Scripts at 1-877-882-3335 or visit www.express-scripts.com/tricare to switch to Home Delivery or with questions about their medications. To switch a prescription to a military pharmacy, beneficiaries may need to get a new prescription from their doctor.

    Some individuals are exempt, including people with another prescription drug plan, or people living overseas. People living in a nursing home may contact Express Scripts to request a waiver from the Pilot.

    TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery is safe, convenient and easy to use. Home Delivery offers beneficiaries a 90-day supply of their medication with no copay for generic drugs and $13 for brand name drugs. Switching from a retail pharmacy to Home Delivery can save TRICARE beneficiaries up to $152 every year for each prescription. Beneficiaries can also save by asking their doctor to write them a prescription for a generic version of their medication.

    “Getting your medications filled through Home Delivery, or local military pharmacy, is less expensive and provides the same level of support as filling your medication in a retail pharmacy,” Col. Patricia Darnauer, commander of Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, said.  “If you elect to use Fort Hood’s pharmacies, please check with a pharmacist to make sure we have your medication available on our formulary.”

    For the latest information of the TFL Pharmacy Pilot, visit www.tricare.mil/tflpilot.

    – 30 –

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Keeping up with the rapidly increasing number of TRICARE beneficiaries who most often turn to a laptop or cell phone when they have questions, walk in service at the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center TRICARE Service Center (TSC) will no longer be available as of April 1, 2014.  Find out more at www.tricare.mil/TSC.

    CRDAMC patients still have a wide variety of secure, electronic customer service options available through www.tricare.mil. The new “I want to…..” feature puts everything beneficiaries want to do online right on the front page of www.tricare.mil.

    When walk-in service ends April 1, beneficiaries who want get personal assistance can call Humana Military, a division of Humana Government Business at (800) 444-5445 Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. or visit http://www.humana-military.com for enrollment and benefit help.

    All health care, pharmacy, dental and claims contact information is located at www.tricare.mil/contactus. Beneficiaries can get 24/7 TRICARE benefit information at www.tricare.mil, and make enrollment and primary care manager changes, and more online at www.tricare.mil/enrollment.

    Rather than driving to an installation TSC, TRICARE beneficiaries can even combine high-tech with low-tech by downloading health care forms online and sending them in the old fashion way, through the U.S. mail – at a cost of less than 50 cents. 

    Walk-in customer service is also the most expensive possible customer service option. By eliminating walk-in customer service at TSCs, the Department of Defense estimates savings of approximately $250 million over five years. The change does not affect TRICARE benefits or health care delivery.

    For updates on this or any other information regarding healthcare services at CRDAMC, please visit the CRDAMC website at http://www.crdamc.amedd.army.mil/Default.aspx.

    – 30 –

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – After 12 months of hard work, four additional Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center primary care clinics have been recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) as Level 3 Patient Centered Medical Homes.  Thomas Moore Health Clinic, Bennett Health Clinic, Russell Collier Health Clinic and the Family Medicine Residency Center now bear the NCQA seal of approval. Last year our three Community Based Medical Homes received similar recognition.    

    The NCQA is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving health care quality.  Since its founding in 1990, NCQA has been a central figure in driving health improvement throughout the healthcare system.  As part of the recognition process, NCQA reviewed hundreds of documents submitted by the staff at each of these clinics which provided fact-based evidence that the clinic was conducting business as a true Medical Home.

    “Earning Level III NCQA recognition reflects CRDAMC’s commitment to The Surgeon General’s vision of transforming from a healthcare system to a system for health.  Our clinics now rank amongst the highest nationwide – military or otherwise - in terms of quality.  This achievement underscores our commitment to providing high quality care to our patients, where they need it.  We are very proud of the hard work and dedication our teams put into making this transformation and are excited about the improved capabilities we bring to our patients,” Dr. (Col.) Frank Hauger, MD, CRDAMC Department of Family and Community Medicine, said.

    The NCQA measures the ability of medical facilities to provide quality healthcare through standardized, objective measurement guidelines.  NCQA requires recognized facilities to enhance access to care and patients' continuity with their provider teams, keep track of patient data to help manage patients' wellbeing, plan and manage care using evidence-based practices, provide self-care support and community resources, as well as track and coordinate tests, referrals and other care for patients. Finally, clinics have to show that they measure their performance and patients' feedback to continue improving the quality of care.

    Here’s what patients can expect from the (Insert Clinic Name) Medical Home?

    •        A personal provider. Each patient has an ongoing relationship with a personal Physician, Physician Assistant or Nurse Practitioner who is trained to provide first contact, continuous and comprehensive care.

    •        Physician directed medical practice. The personal physician leads a team(s) of individuals at the practice level who collectively take responsibility for ongoing patient care. 

    •        Whole person orientation.  The personal provider is responsible for providing all of the patient’s health care needs or for arranging care with other qualified professionals.

    •        Coordinated and Integrated Care. Each patient’s care is coordinated and integrated across all elements of the health care system and the patient’s community.

    •        Quality and Safety focus:  All members of the healthcare team are focused on ensuring high quality care in the medical home.

    •        Improved access:  In the PCMH, enhanced access to care options are available through open scheduling, same day appointments, secure messaging,  and other innovative options for communication between patients, their personal physician and practice staff.

    Army Medicine’s goal is to have all of its primary care facilities in the continental United States and overseas achieve NCQA recognition and transform to the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model of care no later than October 1, 2014.  The transition to the PCMH model of care is part of Army Medicine’s overall shift from a health care system to a system for health. 

    –30 –

     

     

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas –Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and its primary care clinics will modify operating hours in observance of President’s Day, Feb. 17.  The hospital remains open every day for emergency services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

    Monday, Feb. 17 - President’s Day, Federal Holiday Observed: All Department of Family and Community Medicine clinics will be closed. Closures include:  Copperas Cove Medical Home, Harker Heights Medical Home, Killeen Medical Home, Bennett, Thomas Moore, Monroe, Russell Collier, Family Medicine Residency Center and TMC #12.

    Pharmacy

    The Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for new medical treatment facility prescriptions only. The Refill Pharmacy, located at the Clear Creek PX, will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. All other pharmacies will be closed.

    Darnall, outpatient clinics, and all pharmacies will resume normal opening hours Tuesday, Feb. 18.

    Nurse Advice Line

    Darnall’s Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (254) 553-3695. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area and are entitled to military healthcare, will receive guidance from registered nurses on urgent or non-urgent situations. Beneficiaries may also seek information on self-care for injuries or illnesses.

     -30-

  • FORT HOOD, Texas -- January is National Blood Donor Month, and in celebration Robertson Blood Center will host an Open House Jan. 22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to thank the men and women who have worked hard to ensure blood and blood products are available for our military family members year-round.

    Since the inception of Robertson Blood Center, our dedicated donors have helped ensure that ill or injured service members, veterans and their families receive the lifesaving blood they need.

    Lt. Col. Jose F. Quesada, director of Robertson Blood Center said, “As in years past, 2013 has been a successful year and we want to thank our tremendous donors for it.  Whether you are donating platelets, whole blood, making cookies, or spreading the word of an upcoming blood drive, your efforts have helped save lives. Thank you!”

    Blood is traditionally in short supply during the winter months due to the holidays, travel, inclement weather and illness. January, in particular, is a difficult month for blood centers to collect blood donations. A reduction in turnout can put our blood inventory at a critical low.  January has been designated as National Blood Donor Month to thank our donors and to encourage others to give blood.

    "We also want to welcome the many people who are not familiar with our program. Please join us in our celebration of those who have given such selfless gifts by attending the Robertson Blood Center Open House. We will be taking blood donations on that day and will also have tours available and additional information about Robertson Blood Center’s mission," Quesada said. "We are eagerly looking forward to another great year. With your help, we can ensure that we continue to save lives."

    To find out more about Robertson Blood Center, go to:
    www.militaryblood.dod.mil, or visit our Facebook page at: www.facebook.com/FtHoodRBC.

    Blood Donor Month cover

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and its primary care clinics will modify operating hours in observance of the Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal holiday, Jan. 20. The hospital remains open every day for emergency services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

    Monday, Jan. 20 - MLK Jr., Federal holiday observed: All Department of Family and Community Medicine clinics will be closed. Closures include:  Copperas Cove Medical Home, Harker Heights Medical Home, Killeen Medical Home, Bennett, Thomas Moore, Monroe, Russell Collier, Family Medicine Residency Center and TMC #12.

    Pharmacy

    The Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for new medical treatment facility prescriptions only. The Refill Pharmacy, located at the Clear Creek PX, will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. All other pharmacies will be closed.

    Darnall, outpatient clinics, and all pharmacies will resume normal opening hours Tuesday, Jan. 21.

    Nurse Advice Line 

    Darnall’s Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (254) 553-3695. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area and are entitled to military healthcare, will receive guidance from registered nurses on urgent or non-urgent situations. Beneficiaries may also seek information on self-care for injuries or illnesses.

     

    —30—

     

     

  • By Brandy Gill, CRDAMC Public Affairs

    FORT HOOD, Texas –Spc. Justin Newman and his wife Sabrina Newman won’t soon forget their 2014 New Year’s celebration because just 16 minutes after midnight they welcomed their first child, a boy, into the world.

    Fisher Alan Newman, the first baby born in the Bell County area in 2014, weighed in at 7 pounds, 9 ounces and was 19 ¾ inches, Maj. Brenda Ploof, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center labor and delivery clinical nurse and officer in charge, said.

    Little Fisher wasn’t due until Jan. 21, but his parents said when Sabrina Newman came in to get some medication for a cold on Dec. 30, she was told she was staying until she delivered.

    “They told me well, you’re already three centimeters dilated so we’re going to admit you. I was like, okay. I guess I can’t say no now,” she said.

    Spc. Newman, a Soldier with 410 MP Co., 720th MP Bn., 89th MP Bde., said it was at that point the couple called Marcella Hardy, Mrs. Newman’s mother who lives in Willmington, N.C., to let her know her grandson was on the way.

    “I got the call, and I immediately started looking for flights. It took two flights, and I got here at about 6 p.m. on the 31st. He waited for me,” Hardy said.

    According to Newman labor lasted about 10 ½ hours, and it was a life-changing experience he’ll never forget.

    “This was the coolest thing I have ever been a part of. The nurses let me help out. Nothing will ever be able to compare to this experience,” he said.

    Hardy said it was a very special experience for her as well.

    “As a mother, watching your child give birth is the most humbling experience. To hear her call Fisher’s name after he was born – it was just amazing to me. I’m very proud of her,” she said.

    Shortly after birth, Fisher was moved to the CRDAMC Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for monitoring due to some breathing problems associated with labor, and although the Newman’s may go home before their son they are waiting patiently for him to be ready to join them.

    “I want to take him home,” Sabrina Newman said. “I’m ready to get our little family started.”

     – 30 –

    CRDAMC 1st baby of 2014

    CRDAMC 1st baby of 2014

    Fisher Alan Newman, first child of Spc. Justin and Sabrina Newman, was born Jan. 1 at 12:16 a.m., weighed 7 pounds 9 ounces and was 19 3/4 inches long (Photo by CRDAMC Public Affairs).

     

    CRDAMC 1st baby of 2014 pic 2

    CRDAMC 1st baby of 2014 pic 2

    Justin Newman kisses his new born son, Fisher Alan Newman, who is being monitored in the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Neonatal Intensive Care Unit following his birth. Fisher was the first baby born in 2014 in the Bell County area (Photo by CRDAMC Public Affairs).

    CRDAMC 1st baby of 2014 pic 3

    CRDAMC 1st baby of 2014 pic 3

    Spc. Justin Newman, a Soldier with 410 MP Co., 720th MP Bn., 89th MP Bde., and his wife, Sabrina Newman, both of Willmington, N.C., walk to the CRDAMC NICU after the birth of their first child, Fisher Alan Newman (Photo by CRDAMC Public Affairs).

    CRDAMC 1st baby of 2014 pic 4

    CRDAMC 1st baby of 2014 pic 4

    From left: Justin Newman, Sabrina Newman and Marcella Hardy receive gifts from Maj. Brenda Ploof, the CRDAMC labor and delivery clinical nurse and officer in charge following the birth of Fisher Alan Newman, the first baby born in 2014 at CRDAMC (Photo by CRDAMC Public Affairs).

    CRDAMC 1st baby of 2014 pic 5

    CRDAMC 1st baby of 2014 pic 5

    Justin and Sabrina Newman talk while Marcella Hardy visits her grandson in the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (Photo by CRDAMC Public Affairs).

  • FORT HOOD, Texas - Spc. Justin and Mrs. Sabrina Newman, of 89th MP Bde., are the proud parents of the first baby born at Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center on Jan. 1, 2014. The infant, a boy, was born at 12:16 a.m., weighs 7 pounds 9 ounces, and is 19 3/4 inches long. 

    Media representatives interested in interviewing the family should meet at the Visitor's Center, Fort Hood Main Gate, at 3 p.m., Jan. 1. 

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and its primary care clinics will modify operating hours in observance of the III Corps, Fort Hood and CRDAMC training and Federal holidays for Christmas and New Year, Dec. 24 – 25, and Dec. 31 - Jan 1.  The hospital remains open every day for emergency services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

    Tuesday, Dec. 24, Christmas Eve- III Corps, Fort Hood, and CRDAMC Training Holiday:

    The following Department of Family Medicine clinics will be closed:

    o        Bennett Health Clinic

    o        Family Medicine Residency

    o        Monroe Health Clinic

    o        TMC-12

    o        Russell Collier

    o        Copperas Cove Medical Home

    o        Harker Heights Medical Home

    o        Killeen Medical Home

    Thomas Moore Health Clinic will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for patients enrolled to any of the above DFCM clinics and the Pediatric Clinic.  Patients are encouraged to call ahead (288-8888) in order to reduce wait times. Internal Medicine enrollees should report to the CRDAMC Emergency Department for care. 

    The Thomas Moore Pharmacy will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and the Refill Pharmacy will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for new medical treatment facility prescriptions only.

    Wednesday, Dec. 25 - Christmas Day, Federal Holiday Observed: All outpatient clinics will be closed.  The hospital remains open every day for labor and delivery, emergency services and inpatient care.

    All CRDAMC Pharmacies will be closed, except the Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, which will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for new medical treatment facility prescriptions only.

    Thursday, Dec. 26. - Darnall and its clinics will resume normal operating hours.

    Tuesday, Dec. 31, New Year’s Eve - III Corps, Fort Hood, and CRDAMC Training Holiday:

    The following Department of Family Medicine clinics will be closed:

    o        Bennett Health Clinic

    o        Family Medicine Residency

    o        Monroe Health Clinic

    o        TMC-12

    o        Russell Collier

    o        Copperas Cove Medical Home

    o        Harker Heights Medical Home

    o        Killeen Medical Home

    Thomas Moore Health Clinic will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for patients enrolled to any of the above DFCM clinics and the Pediatric Clinic.  Patients are encouraged to call ahead (288-8888) in order to reduce wait times. Internal Medicine enrollees should report to the CRDAMC Emergency Department for care. 

    The Thomas Moore Pharmacy will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and the Refill Pharmacy will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for new medical treatment facility prescriptions only.

    Tuesday, Jan. 1 - New Year’s Day, Federal Holiday Observed: All outpatient clinics will be closed.  The hospital remains open every day for labor and delivery, emergency services and inpatient care.

    All CRDAMC Pharmacies will be closed, except the Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, which will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for new medical treatment facility prescriptions only.

    Thursday, Jan. 2 - Darnall and all outpatient clinics will resume normal operating hours.

    Nurse Advice Line

    Darnall’s Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (254) 553-3695. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area and who are entitled to military healthcare will receive guidance from registered nurses on urgent or non-urgent situations. Beneficiaries may also seek information on self-care for injuries or illnesses. 

    – 30 –

     

  • By Brandy Gill, CRDAMC Public Affairs

    FORT HOOD, Texas – It’s been three years since ground was broken on the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Replacement Hospital , and now the new facility is quickly approaching a new major milestone, drying in.

    Drying–in is the process of weatherproofing a building, which means it receives a new exterior surface, and each element including the foundation, roof and walls are sealed to prevent the entry of water and wind into the building.

    Erika Provinsal, deputy program manager with the Health Facility Planning Office, said determining exterior surfaces for the new facility can be like viewing the surfaces of a standard box.

    “A box and a building both have six elements, the bottom or foundation, the top or roof and four sides or walls. The foundation is waterproofed as a part of the placement of the concrete floor slab by use of a vapor barrier. The vapor barrier often looks like a very thick plastic sheet,” she said. 

    The exterior walls are weatherproofed when they are covered with materials like brick, vinyl siding, metal siding panels, precast panels, stone work or glass curtain walls.

    Some of the wall systems have an included waterproof membrane. Others have a building wrap of waterproof membrane placed inside the exterior covering. Any seams between exterior coverings are sealed closed by a sealed joint, a caulking system, a flashing system or a combination of systems, Provinsal said.

    The roof is a composite system of materials like asphalt sheets, asphalt shingles, metal panels, plastic membrane or rubber membrane along with a series of flashings and caulking joints.

    According to Provinsal, drying-in is significant because it means the building is ready to have systems installed. It represents the construction focus has shifted from merely a structure to a functional building in preparation to become a hospital.

    “Some of the many systems installed are the heating and/or cooling system, interior room and corridor walls.  All the sinks, cabinetry and other electrical and plumbing fixtures will also be installed at this time.  Additionally, the electronic systems for Nurse Call, Fire Alarm, Public Address and Security must have a weather-tight building to insure proper functioning,” she said.

    Although the building looks finished from the outside it still has a long way to go to be ready for patients.

    Now hundreds of people will work for months to turn the completed building into a hospital. The next flurry of activity is the installation of the furniture, medical and non-medical equipment. This includes all the medical equipment not fixed to the floors and walls, for example physiological monitors, portable x-rays, and ultrasound machines,” Provinsal said

    All of the new medical equipment will require calibration (adjustment after moving), certification and testing by qualified biomedical engineers prior to training and patient use.

    “Staff not only must be fully trained on each piece of equipment, they must be oriented to the facility.  Orientation includes way-finding, where other departments and areas are located, department orientation, how and where things work in their own areas, and how new systems function in the hospital, such as housekeeping and nutrition,” she said.

    While the new hospital continues to take shape physically, another building process has also begun metaphorically, transition.

    Transition is an ongoing process to ensure the staff is ready to work in the new building once it’s complete, Maj. Ira Waite, CRDAMC transition director, said.

    “Running the day to day operations of a hospital can get hectic.  Include multiple clinics and various outpatient services and you could have a recipe for chaos.  The way people survive in this environment is by following routines as much as possible and adapting when necessary,” he said. “With the pending move into the new hospital building, the only way the staff will be prepared is to evaluate every routine and determine what will work in the new space and what will not.  In order to provide the best health care, our excellent doctors, nurses, and support staff will be reevaluating every standard of practice, routine, and policy.” 

    According to Waite, while preparations are already underway, staff training and education for the new facility will officially begin about six months before the hospital opens.

    “We anticipate having a state-of-the-art facility including all the modern equipment.  The staff will be capable of providing better services with this new equipment.  Our education services are being revamped to include specific training on this new equipment,” he said.

    The culmination of all this hard work is the Day in the Life, where the hospital will simulate, and staff will work through scenarios as if it were happening in real life, Provinsal said. All the orientation, training and outfitting will be tested and then readjusted as necessary through review of the day’s activities.

    Up to 300 staff along with volunteers will participate in this activity. 

    The Day in the Life exercise will imitate the daily operations and ensure CRDAMC providers and staff have met all the requirements, ensured the safety of every patient, and become competent in using the new equipment, Waite said.

    “This simulated exercise will also be an opportunity for volunteers to assist in this effort.  We will need real patients to participate and provide feedback on their perceptions,” he said. “This simulation will be a great opportunity to be a part of the legacy that is Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center.” 

    Michel Landerman, training coordinator for U.S. Army Health Facility Planning Agency, contributed to this article.

     - 30 -

     2013 12 11 4th Floor Garden Roof

    A construction worker who is assisting with roofing takes a moment to enjoy the view on what will be the fourth floor roof garden. (Photos provided by the Health Facility Planning Office)

    2013 12 11 4th floor hospital temp windows

    Plastic sheeting temporarily covers windows located on the fourth floor of the new Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Replacement Hospital structure. Eventually the plastic will be replaced with glass, which is part of the drying-in process. (Photos provided by the Health Facility Planning Office)

    2013 12 11 4th floor looking East

    A Texas sunrise viewed from the fourth floor highlights the views that will be available to staff and beneficiaries once construction is complete. Cranes that have been a fixture at the construction site for over a year will be taken down as exterior work draws to a close and interior work begins. (Photos provided by the Health Facility Planning Office)

    2013 12 11 Atrium CRDAMC

    Once complete, the front entrance atrium of the replacement hospital, which faces the current hospital, will have a glass curtain wall, providing plenty of sunshine and a warm welcome to beneficiaries and staff. (Photos provided by the Health Facility Planning Office)

    2013 12 11 Atrium CUP

    A different perspective on the atrium shows the progress that has been made on the replacement hospital structure so far. (Photos provided by the Health Facility Planning Office)

    2013 12 11 CRD Memorial Courtyard

    Once completed, the new CRDAMC Memorial Courtyard will feature a reflecting pool, various sitting areas, and shade trees.  (Photos provided by the Health Facility Planning Office)

    2013 12 11 hospital southeast view

    The exterior of the new hospital viewed from the Southeast. Drying-in is expected to be complete in January 2014. (Photos provided by the Health Facility Planning Office)

    2013 12 11 North Clinic

    A crane seen from a window in what is currently called the North Clinic, along with expansive views of Fort Hood. (Photos provided by the Health Facility Planning Office)

    2013 12 11 Windows temporary mounting

    Windows are temporarily mounted in the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Replacement hospital. The hospital is slated to be open and operational by late summer 2015. (Photos provided by the Health Facility Planning Office)

     

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center (CRDAMC) will host an open house in honor of the new 1st Cavalry Division Embedded Behavioral Health Team (EBHT) grand opening, on Dec. 5, at 10 a.m.

    Embedded Behavioral Health (EBH) is an early intervention and treatment model that promotes Soldier readiness (pre, during, and post-deployment).  It significantly improves access to behavioral health care for active duty Soldiers, better supports the mission readiness of the force and improves the communication between behavioral health professionals and line leaders.

    Fort Hood has been dedicated to EBH and providing Soldiers with this proven, superior model of behavioral health care delivery since October 2010, when CRDAMC, in a coordinated effort with 1st Cavalry Division, fielded the first Embedded Behavioral Health team in the 1Cav. Div. footprint. 

    The EBH model provides multi-disciplinary behavioral health care to Soldiers close to their unit area and in coordination with unit leaders to maximize diagnostic accuracy and improve treatment outcomes in support of the Army Force Generation cycle and to ultimately, reduce risk.

    In the EBH model, an EBH team is integrated within the footprint of the unit it serves and it is dedicated to that unit. This enables Soldiers and their commands to form relationships with their providers and develop trust in their team. 

    The team is dedicated to a specific unit which ensures continuity of care, allows for better access to care, and decreases the stigma of behavioral health care.  EBH delivers on the promise of safe and effective medical care through evidence-based treatments for Soldiers and expert consultation for combat leaders to spearhead the Army’s effort to increase resilience and reduce morbidity from psychiatric disease which can impact individual and unit readiness.

    The new 1st Cav. Div. EBHT will be located in Bldg. 29028 on the corner of Battalion Avenue and 72nd Street.

    Media interested in attending this event should contact the CRDAMC Public Affairs Office at (254) 288-8005 or 286-7954 by 4 p.m. Dec. 4, for meeting time and location.

    – 30 –

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and its primary care clinics will modify operating hours in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday, Nov. 28 - 29.  The hospital remains open every day for emergency services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

    Primary and Urgent Care Services

    •      Thursday, Nov. 28 – Thanksgiving Day

    All CRDAMC Department of Family Medicine clinics and pharmacies will be closed. All acute care patients can contact the Nurse Advice Line for medical advice or go directly to the Emergency Department.

     

    •       Friday, Nov. 29

    The following Department of Family Medicine clinics will be closed:

    • o   Bennett Health Clinic
    • o   Family Medicine Residency
    • o   Monroe Health Clinic
    • o   TMC-12
    • o   Russell Collier
    • o   Copperas Cove Medical Home
    • o   Harker Heights Medical Home
    • o   Killeen Medical Home 

    Thomas Moore Health Clinic will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for walk-in patients

    enrolled to any of the above DFCM clinics and the Pediatric Clinic. Internal Medicine enrollees should report to the CRDAMC Emergency Department for care.

    Darnall and its clinics will resume normal opening hours on Monday, Dec. 2.

    Pharmacies

    Thursday, Nov. 28

    All CRDAMC Pharmacies will be closed, except the Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, which will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for new medical treatment facility prescriptions only.

    Friday, Nov. 29

    The Thomas Moore Pharmacy will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and the Refill Pharmacy will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for new medical treatment facility prescriptions only.

    Saturday, Nov. 30

    The Refill Pharmacy will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. All other pharmacies are closed.

    All pharmacies return to normal operating hours on Monday, Dec. 2.

    Nurse Advice Line

    Darnall’s Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (254) 553-3695. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area entitled to military healthcare may talk to registered nurses about urgent health issues, guidance on non-emergency situations, and information about self-care for injuries or illnesses.

    – 30 –

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and its primary care clinics will modify operating hours in observance of the Veterans Day Federal holiday Monday, Nov. 11.  The hospital remains open every day for emergency services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

    Primary and Urgent Care Services

    Friday, Nov. 8:

    All outlying health clinics will remain open for normal dependent care.  This includes Bennett Health Clinic, Russell Collier Health Clinic, Thomas Moore Health Clinic, and all Community Based Medical Homes.

    Thomas Moore Health Clinic will conduct Soldier care as follows: sick call from 7 – 8 a.m., and walk-in urgent care from 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Soldiers assigned to Division West may still walk in to Bennett Health Clinic during normal sick call hours.

    All clinics and Community Based Medical Homes will be closed Saturday through Monday, Nov 9th - 11th.

    During the holiday period from Nov. 9 – 11, Internal Medicine patients and TRICARE Prime enrollees with urgent care needs should go to the Emergency Department.

    The Patient Appointment Service, 288-8888, is open from 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 9, closed Saturday, Sunday and Monday, and will resume services Tuesday, Nov. 12.

    Darnall and its clinics will resume normal opening hours on Tuesday, Nov. 12.

    Nurse Advice Line

    Darnall’s Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (254) 553-3695. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area entitled to military healthcare may talk to registered nurses about urgent health issues, guidance on non-emergency situations, and information about self-care for injuries or illnesses.

    Pharmacies

    All CRDAMC Pharmacies will maintain normal operating hours from 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., Nov. 8 – 10.

    Nov. 11th

    The Refill Pharmacy will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Main Outpatient Pharmacy, located in the hospital basement, will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for new medical treatment facility prescriptions only.

    All other pharmacies will be closed.

    All pharmacies return to normal operating hours on Tuesday, Nov. 12.

    – 30 –

     

  • By Kim Zamarripa

    FORT HOOD, Texas – October is American Pharmacist Month, and in recognition of this observance, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center encourages beneficiaries to get to know your pharmacist and your medication.

    There are over 300,000 licensed pharmacists in the United States; each specifically trained as a medication expert to ensure safe and effective use of medications. 

    Every year in the U.S., failure to take medications as prescribed causes more than 1.5 million preventable medication-related adverse events and costs the health care system approximately $290 billion.  The likelihood of medication errors occurring decreases substantially when patients know their pharmacist and feel comfortable asking questions and seeking the pharmacist’s advice.

    Lt. Col. Kevin Roberts, CRDAMC Chief of Pharmacy, oversees 44 pharmacists and 74 pharmacy technicians who support 13 outpatient pharmacy’s within a 45-mile radius of the medical center, including troop clinic pharmacies, community based medical homes (CBMH), an outpatient hospital pharmacy, and an inpatient pharmacy. Combined, these pharmacies dispense over 5,000 prescriptions every day.

    In addition to providing medications, “The CRDAMC pharmacy staff provides medication therapy management (MTM) services at several areas within the medical center; including the emergency department (ED), intensive care unit/surgical ward, and behavior health ward,” Roberts said. “MTM services are also offered at many of the clinics, including the Soldier in Transition clinic, internal medicine clinic, and public health clinic and through other programs such as the restoration and rehabilitation programs.”

    “Your pharmacist is an integral part of the health care team, working to ensure the best selection and management of your prescription and nonprescription medicines. Pharmacists continue to serve as information resources, but are expanding their roles as direct care providers; directly assessing patients and assisting providers in managing anticoagulation, high cholesterol, asthma, multiple medications (polypharmacy) and other disease states.”  

    Although patients are ultimately responsible for managing their healthcare, utilizing the pharmacist can help you understand your medications and avoid problems with medication allergies, drug interactions and excessive medication use. 

    “By utilizing our pharmacies for your prescription needs, you’re guaranteed access to a pharmacist,” he said.  “Pharmacists provide patients knowledge and collaboratively work with their health care team to enhance medication use and outcomes.”

    Pharmacists don’t act alone; they’re supported by a team of pharmacy technicians to ensure safe and efficient provision of medication therapy.  Pharmacy technicians are the backbone of the pharmacy.  Each technician has specialized training and skill in assessing, processing and troubleshooting prescription orders.  These professionals are vital to the success of the medication use process. 

    CRDAMC Pharmacy has some of the “top technicians” in the Army Medical Department.  This year, Army Pharmacy’s top clinical technician was CRDAMC’s own Ms. Beth Rayman.

    According to Roberts, “(Rayman is) a fine example of the caliber and competence that supports CRDAMC and Fort Hood Pharmacy operations.”

    SIDEBAR

    There are multiple prescription options available to Fort Hood Pharmacy beneficiaries; including self-care prescriptions, prescription drop-off, drive-through pharmacy at Thomas Moore Health Clinic, or  Tricare’s mail-order pharmacy. Each CRDAMC clinic has its own pharmacy to support patients enrolled to those clinics; collaborating with the clinic health care team to optimize selection and provision of medications.

    CRDAMC main pharmacy also offers a prescription drop-off option to assist in providing more flexibility with your personal time. This option is available from 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday and 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. on Thursdays. If your prescription is dropped off before noon, it will be ready the same day at 4 p.m. If your prescription is dropped off after noon it will be ready to pick-up the following morning after 9 a.m. So instead of sitting and waiting for a prescription, beneficiaries can go back to work, run errands, or even come back the next day at their convenience.

    The Tricare mail order pharmacy is another great option for patients who require medications that aren’t regularly stocked in the CRDAMC pharmacies or have prescriptions that require regular refills.

    All mail order medicines are delivered directly to your house which eliminates the hassle of dealing with traffic, parking or lines at the pharmacy and it saves  money in fuel costs. Small co-pays may apply with this service. While there is usually no copay for generic prescriptions, there is a $13 co-pay for brand names and a $43 co-pay for non-formulary medications for up to a 90-day supply.

    To use the Tricare mail order pharmacy beneficiaries should ask their doctor for a 90-day supply (one prescription with three refills) of their medication, then log on to www.express-scripts.com and print a prescription order form, or call 877-363-1303. Once the form is filled out, mail it with the written prescription and payment to the address on the form.

    Beneficiaries who prefer retail pharmacies can still use this option.  Sometimes this option is necessary, especially if the military pharmacy is closed or doesn’t carry a medication needed immediately, but remember all retail pharmacies will require a co-pay. Usually those fees are $5 for generic prescriptions, $17 for brand names and $44 for non-formulary medications for a 30-day supply.  

    For a list of retail pharmacies that honor Tricare, visit the Express Scripts website at www.express-scripts.com.

    For more information on the CRDAMC pharmacy hours of operation, a complete list of formulary medication or general information, please visit our website at www.crdamc.amedd.army.mil, and click on the pharmacy link located in the left hand column.

     

    2013 10 29 CRDAMC pharmacy photo v1 28 oct 2013.jp

    CRDAMC Main pharmacy services over 5,000 prescriptions per day, seeing on average 2,000 people (Photo by: Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs).

     

    2013 10 29 CRDAMC pharmacy tech

    A pharmacy technician prepares injectable drugs in the pharmacy's sterile preparation area. On average, 250-300 injectable drugs and IV's are made each day (Photo by: Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs).

     

    2013 10 29 CRDAMC pharmacy photo v2

    During recent upgrades, the pharmacy added the ScriptPro, a robotic medication dispensing  device. Pharmacist input prescriptions in the computer and the ScriptPro measures and fills the individual prescriptions (Photo by: Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs).

     

    2013 10 29 Beth Rayman CRDAMC pharm

    CRDAMC Pharmacy Technician Beth Rayman won the 2013 U.S. Army Jeanelle M. Oakley Civilian Pharmacy Technician of the Year award (Photo by Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs).

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center will celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness Month Oct. 28 at the hospital with the “Pink Heals” fire truck tour, and a breast health education table.

    The tour will visit the hospital from 9 – 10:30 a.m. Those who are currently fighting cancer or who have beaten cancer are invited to come and sign the truck and take pictures or videos with the firefighters who travel the country promoting breast cancer awareness.

    After its stop at CRDAMC, the Pink Heals tour will move to the Clear Creek Exchange where it will be available until 1 p.m.

    An information table highlighting breast health awareness and self examination techniques will also be available in Darnall’s front entrance lobby from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. It is sponsored by CRDAMC healthcare professionals who will discuss the importance of self exams, identifying suspicious lumps or masses and when to seek advice from a primary care manager.

    Patients who believe they have a suspicious spot, lump or mass, or who are concerned about their breast health for any reason, should see their primary care provider immediately.

    One in eight women in the U.S. will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women after lung cancer.

    Early detection of breast cancer is increased dramatically by a regular schedule of breast self-exams, mammograms and clinical breast exams.

    – 30 –

    Pink Heals fire truck at CRDAMC

    Firefighters stand in front of a Pink Heals fire truck during a previous visit to Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center. CRDAMC will host the Pink Heals tour again this year Monday, Oct. 28, in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

     

  • Seasonal flu vaccine available

    FORT HOOD, Texas – The 39th annual Retiree Health Fair sponsored by Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center will be held Oct. 26 at the Thomas Moore Health Clinic located on the corner of 58th Street and 761st Tank Battalion Ave. on Fort Hood.  

    Representatives from various CRDAMC departments will be on hand from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 26, dispensing information, conducting screenings, and answering questions for Central Texas retired military personnel and their spouses. 

    The seasonal flu vaccine, always the biggest draw for retirees, will be available. Retirees are also encouraged to get the Tetanus, Pneumococcal, and Zostavax shots, which will also be available at the health fair. Retirees must bring a note signed by their primary care provider stating there are no contraindications for the individual to receive the Zostavax immunization, which is a vaccine that helps prevent Shingles in individuals 50 years of age and older.

    Vaccines will not be available for children of retirees attending the health fair.

    Retirees can also take advantage of screening opportunities covering healthcare concerns such as glucose level, blood pressure, weight, and dental.

    Representatives from various Darnall Medical Center clinics and departments will have booths and information on such topics as tobacco cessation, nutrition, complementary and alternative medicines, diabetes, asthma, Team Up in your health care, women’s health, pharmacy, physical therapy, substance abuse, behavioral health and dental care.

    DENTAC will provide oral cancer screening services and have an information table set up at the health fair.

    For more information, contact the Health Promotion & Wellness Program, at 288-8488.

    -30-

    Retiree Health Fair 2013

    Stock image provided by CRDAMC Public Affairs.

    Retiree Health Fair flyer 2013

    39th Annual CRDAMC Retiree Health Fair flyer lists available services at this year's event.

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and its primary care clinics will modify operating hours Oct. 11-14 in observance of the Columbus Day federal holiday. The hospital will remain open every day for emergency and urgent care, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

    Friday, Oct. 11: Thomas Moore Health Clinic, besides normal clinic operations, will conduct sick call and walk-in appointments from 7 - 8 a.m. and walk-in urgent care from 7a.m.-4p.m. Soldiers assigned to Division West may still walk in to Bennett Health Clinic for care during normal sick call hours. TMC 12 and Monroe clinic will be closed; other clinics will be open for dependent care.

    All Community Based Medical Homes will continue normal operating hours Friday, Oct. 11, but will be closed Monday, Oct. 14.

    Pharmacies 

    On Saturday, Oct. 12 and Monday, Oct. 14 the Main Hospital Pharmacy will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and the Clear Creek PX Refill Pharmacy will be open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

    Additionally, the Robertson Blood Center will be closed on Monday, Oct. 14 and return to regular hours Tuesday, Oct. 15.

    The Patient Appointment Service, (254) 288-8888, is open from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, and closed Saturday through Monday, Oct. 14. Darnall and its clinics will also resume normal opening hours Tuesday, Oct. 15.

    Nurse Advice Line

    Darnall’s Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (254) 553-3695. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area entitled to military healthcare may speak to registered nurses about urgent health issues, guidance on non-emergency situations, and information about self-care for injuries or illnesses.

    -30-

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – As a result of the government shutdown due to a lack of appropriated funds, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center will modify operating hours in Patient Administration. Patients can expect delays in routine medical documentation requests, medical record copies, and patient advocate representatives addressing concerns.

    The hospital will remain open every day for emergency and urgent care services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services. Clinics are open, appointments and scheduled surgeries at this point will not be affected or canceled. Pharmacies, labs, and radiology will continue to provide services to include refill of medications. Additionally, the Robertson Blood Center is open and able to accept blood donations on a walk-in basis Monday through Friday. Individuals should call 254-285-5808 to make an appointment for platelet donations.

    CRDAMC will continue to reassess services and activities in the lapse of appropriated funds.

    “We are committed to minimizing disruption in the delivery of quality care our Soldiers, Families   and Veterans deserve and expect, and we will remain positive and focused on meeting our beneficiaries’ needs during every patient encounter," said Col. Patricia Darnauer, CRDAMC Commander.

    If beneficiaries are uncertain about the status of a scheduled appointment, they are encouraged to call the CRDAMC Patient Appointing Service at 254-288-8888.

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Influenza (flu) season is approaching and it’s almost time for annual vaccinations once again.

    Influenza, better known as the flu, is a contagious respiratory illness that can lead to mild to serious illness, hospitalization, and even death. 

    The Flu season typically peaks in the months of January and February; however the United States has seen flu outbreaks as early as October, Cpt. Jennifer Istre, an Army Public Health nurse said.

    “The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services reports that approximately 5 – 20 percent of U.S. residents will get the flu each year. Based on the 2010 Census, there are approximately 400,000 individuals who live in the Bell, Coryell, and Lampasas counties combined.  That means statistically, our area could see between 20,000 – 80,000 cases of actual flu illness in our population.  That’s a lot of flu potentially being passed around!”

    The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website recently released information on three easy steps that can help stop influenza from spreading.

    Step one; take time to get the flu vaccine, the CDC website says.

    According to Istre, it is the best protection against getting the virus which also stops it from spreading as quickly.

    “Although there are many different flu viruses, this year’s flu vaccine will protect against three to four common flu virus strains,” she said. “Everyone 6 months and older are highly encouraged to get their flu vaccine.”

    According to the CDC, young children, pregnant women, individuals with chronic illnesses, and people over 65 years of age are considered high risk for serious flu complications and vaccination can decrease their risk of severe flu illness.

    “Vaccination also is important for health care workers, and other people who live with or care for high risk people to keep from spreading flu to high risk people,” the CDC website states.

    Step two; take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs, the CDC states.

    Following every-day ‘healthy’ self care practices like washing your hands regularly, covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you sneeze or cough, getting adequate sleep, eating nutritious meals, and keeping yourself healthy overall, is a good way to avoid contracting the flu, Istre said.

    “You should avoid close contact with sick people and stay at home if you feel sick with flu-like symptoms for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone,” she said. “Also make sure you clean and disinfect surfaces that may be contaminated.  The flu virus can live on surfaces up to 8 hours and be transferred to others easily.”

    Istre advises that parents should keep a close eye on children and have them cough into their sleeves if they don’t have a tissue, and teach them not to place their fingers in their mouths. 

    “Remember, the flu virus has to first enter our nose or mouths to make us sick.  The flu virus is easily spread to others within a six feet distance by coughing, sneezing, or talking,” she said.  “When healthy adults are infected with the virus they can infect others a day before they develop symptoms and up to a week after they are sick.” 

    Step three according to the CDC is to take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them. Medication will help make the illness milder, shorten the time someone is sick, and help prevent serious flu complications.  Follow all instructions given by your doctor if prescribed antiviral medications.  The majority of people who get the flu may start feeling better after a couple of days but may not make a full recovery for two weeks, their website states.

    “The flu is a virus and not a bacterium so an antibiotic will not help when an individual has contracted the flu.  Antiviral medications are available only by prescription and have been shown to work best when they are started within the first two days of getting sick,” Istre said. 

    Common signs and symptoms of the flu include: fever, chills, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches, and fatigue. 

    “This flu season be proactive and take charge of your family’s health this year. You can reduce your chances of getting the flu and spreading it. If you suspect you have the flu make an appointment with your doctor as soon as possible, she said. “The best action you can take prior to contracting the flu is to follow step 1 of the CDC’s “Take 3” and take time to get your vaccination.”

    The Flumist and pediatric influenza injectable has started arriving at Fort Hood.  However, adult injectable influenza vaccine is not scheduled to arrive at Fort Hood until late October. 

    Only certain individuals are eligible to receive the Flumist vaccine.  It is reserved for individuals 2 – 49 years-old, who are not pregnant and do not have any chronic illness or weakened immune systems. Additionally, they must meet all requirements on the vaccine screening form. 

    Patients should contact their clinics with questions regarding getting their vaccine and their eligibility for Flumist. More information can be found at www.crdamc.amedd.army.mil.

    All Tricare beneficiaries are authorized to get their vaccines off-post at Tricare authorized establishments. Prior to receiving an immunization off post, beneficiary’s should ask if the facility or business accepts Tricare.  All CRDAMC employees (military and civilians) must provide proof of vaccination to Occupational Health to ensure compliance of healthcare vaccination.  Proof needs to include the vaccine manufacturer name, Lot number, and expiration date of vaccine.  All other beneficiaries should provide proof to their clinics to have the vaccination added to their shot record.

    – 30 –

    Following are stock photos provided by CRDAMC Public Affairs.

    stock photo flu vac story

    stock photo 2 flu vac story

    stock photo 3 flu vac story

    stock photo 4 flu vac story

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center will celebrate its 2nd annual Walk to Remember event Sept. 26 at the Fort Hood Spiritual Resiliency Center at 3:30 p.m.  

    The occasion is held as a special day of remembrance for families who have suffered the loss of a child and pregnancy during the last year. 

    October is recognized as National Pregnancy and Infant-loss Awareness month. In recognition, ‘Walk to Remember’ memorial celebrations will be held nationwide to bring awareness to the difficult issues of miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth and neonatal death, Chap. James Russell, a CRDAMC chaplain said.

    “We cannot take away the pain of loss, but we can all help to ease the pain by providing a day to remember their child, grandchild, niece, nephew or dear friend’s child,” Russell said.

    While walk participants share a common grief, the Walk to Remember is not a sad event.

    “Together we celebrate and remember our babies in a gentle, joyous environment,” Russell said.

    This year’s event will feature a Memorial ceremony, “remember when” card commemoration, group walk, refreshments and wonderful friends.

    The Fort Hood Spiritual Resiliency center is located on the corner of 33rd Street and Battalion Avenue.

    – 30 –

  • By Brandy Gill, CRDAMC Public Affairs

    FORT HOOD, Texas – It’s 2 a.m., and your 2-year-old is congested, running a fever, has some sort of rash and can’t sleep. You’re considering a trip to the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Emergency Department, but is it necessary?

    All beneficiaries find themselves in this, or a similar situation at one time or another.

    When is the right time to go to the Emergency Department? Do you need emergent, urgent or routine care, and what’s the difference anyway? It’s all the same medical system, right?

    Appropriate use of the medical center’s resources not only helps CRDAMC, but also all of the beneficiaries who receive care here, Col. Patricia Darnauer, CRDAMC commander, said.

    “ED visits cost the U.S. Army approximately three times more than PCM (primary care manager) visits for the same complaint.  We are already in a time of budgetary constraint,” she said. “If PCM visit volume goes down, our budget for staffing is cut, and fewer services are available.”

    In short, mismanaged care could end up cutting services which means even less routine care availability when you need it.

    When beneficiaries misuse emergency services they may actually be hurting others Maj. Michael Simpson, chief of the CRDAMC Emergency Department said.

    “Every non-emergent patient who comes to the ED prolongs the wait for those who truly require our care,” he said.

    The key to knowing when to use emergency services is to know the difference between emergent, urgent and routine care.

    Emergent care is medical care that directly addresses threats to life, limb, or eyesight.  Examples include heart attack, stroke, gunshot wounds, major motor vehicle accidents, open fractures, appendicitis, severe allergic reactions that make it difficult to breath, bleeding that does not stop with 10 minutes of direct pressure, wounds requiring stitches, poisoning, a major injury such as head trauma, persistent vomiting, or suicidal or homicidal feelings Simpson said.

    A condition is considered urgent when it is not life threatening, but requires care in a timely manner (within 24 hours). Examples include conditions which could deteriorate or are not bearable due to discomfort.

    Routine is care for stable patients whose condition will not deteriorate over time and/or will typically resolve on its own.  Examples include seasonal allergies, pregnancy tests, sports or school physicals, or any complaint for a problem chronic in nature.

    “Access to care standards for routine care can vary, but for most situations it is seven calendar days. Wellness and health promotion services, physical exams, well woman exams and referrals for specialty care may take up to 28 days,” Darnauer said.

    Patients should ask themselves: ‘Is my condition so grave that I cannot wait to see my PCM?’ If you are considering going to the ER but feel it is necessary to call and find out the wait time, then you probably do not have a medical emergency Simpson said.  

    Conditions that frequently show up at the Emergency Department that should be handled by a PCM include cold, cough, sore throat, flu, ear ache, sexually transmitted diseases, fever controlled with over the counter medicines, rashes, minor insect bites or stings, sprains, minor cuts with controlled bleeding, suspected new pregnancy, non-emergent subspecialty referrals (dermatology, chiropractic, etc.), medical second opinions, medication refills, profiles/workman's compensation/line of duty/insurance paperwork/school excuses, school or sports physicals, vaccinations, insomnia and other chronic problem like  hemorrhoids, back pain, fibromyalgia or shin splints.

    Patients who come to the Emergency Department with non-emergent conditions may be sent back to their primary care clinics Simpson said.

    “Active duty presenting to CRDAMC ER Monday through Friday between the hours of 5:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. will be screened by the triage desk.  If their condition is determined to be non-emergent (No threat to life, limb, or eyesight) they will be redirected to their clinic,” he said.

    Additionally, any time an active duty servicemember visits the ER they are required to bring a DD form 689 (sick slip) filled out by unit medical personnel or chain of command, unless the soldier comes emergently. They must also follow-up with their clinic the next duty day. So if you’re a Soldier who’s at the ER at 3 a.m. you’ll be required to go to sick call the same day after you leave the hospital.

    Col. Roger Gallup, CRDAMC deputy commander for clinical services, said clinics are staffed by professionals completely capable of meeting the needs of most patients.

    “Clinics on Fort Hood are staffed with highly trained, board certified medical providers.  They have lab and x-ray capability, as well as fully-staffed pharmacy services.  Unless coming by ambulance, or in an extreme circumstance, the clinic should always be the first stop for medical care.  In the event the medical condition is determined to require the services of the Emergency Department, clinic personnel will arrange transport to CRDAMC,” Gallup said.

    All non-emergent patients presenting to the ER should expect prolonged wait times which will vary depending on the time of day and what other types of patients are present. 

    Nationally, the average wait times for non-emergent patients can be anywhere from 4 to 6 hours.

    If you’re not sure what kind of care you need, contact the CRDAMC Nurse Advice Line at (254) 553-3695. It’s a free 24/7 service for all military healthcare beneficiaries living in the Fort Hood area, and it provides guidance from registered nurses on urgent or non-urgent situations. Beneficiaries may also seek information on self-care for injuries or illnesses. 

    – 30 –

    Ambulances outside CRDAMC Emergency Department 

    Ambulances stand ready to respond to emergent calls for medical assistance outside the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Emergency Department as Soldiers enter the facility (Photo by Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs).

     CRDAMC Emergency Department Entrance

    A CRDAMC Soldier waits just inside the Emergency Department entrance to check patient identification and provide assistance into the facility if needed (Photo by Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs).

     Beneficiaries at CRDAMC Emergency Department

    A Soldier and dependents sign in at Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Emergency Department. The CRDAMC Emergency Department sees an average of 226 patients per day (Photo by Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs).

  • By Brandy Gill, CRDAMC Public Affairs

    FORT HOOD, Texas – The Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Warrior Combat Stress Reset Program celebrated its 5th anniversary of helping Soldiers overcome post traumatic stress with a small graduation ceremony and party on August 15 at the Reset Center.

    The ceremony itself was small but the Reset Program has been enormously successful serving 850 Soldiers to date, Dr. Jerry Wesch, CRDAMC psychologist and director of the Reset program said.

    “Our results have gotten better every year in terms of reducing PTSD symptoms, depression and anxiety,” Wesch said. “We have gotten better at selecting soldiers who are ready for the intense work that we ask of them. The data says we have had somewhat more severe PTSD symptoms in our soldiers but they get more improvement.”

    According to Wesch the methodology the Reset Program uses is what makes it so successful.

    “We approach the problem of PTSD from as many aspects as possible, using a phased approach that starts with reducing hyper-arousal and reducing chronic pain/headache. Then we use a synergy of trauma-focused psychological therapies and complementary and alternative modalities (CAM). The holistic approach allows us to address all facets of the PTSD symptom picture. The synergistic approach is what gives us the power to produce the exceptional healing results,” he said.

    The average group size is 12, and the program lasts three weeks. Soldiers who participate usually find the results and benefits are even better than they expected.

    "Being a part of the program has allowed me to grow, face my fears and hope to move forward.  I created a bond with people, something I thought I would never be able to do," one graduate said.

    Soldiers are chosen to participate in a wide variety of ways, Wesch said.

    “We accept soldiers from a wide range of sources - including self-referral. Our usual referrals come from other Behavioral Health clinics, Chaplains, WTU, Drug & Alcohol programs, Commanders and our own Graduates,” he said. “We evaluate soldiers carefully so that we can ensure their success. We often have soldiers walk into the building and pick up information. We are on the CRDAMC website also ( www.crdamc.amedd.army.mil ).”

    2013 08 19 Reset graduation 1

    Dr. Jerry Wesch, CRDAMC psychologist and director of the Reset program addresses recent graduates of the reset program August 15 while also celebrating the fifth anniversary of the Warrior Combat Stress Reset Program. (Photo by Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs.)

     

     2013 08 19 Reset graduation 2

    Dr. Jerry Wesch, CRDAMC psychologist and director of the Warrior Combat Stress Reset Program congratulates a recent graduate during the ceremony and celebration of the program’s 5th anniversary. (Photo by Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs.)

     

    – 30 –

  • By Brandy Gill, CRDAMC Public Affairs

    FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center will return to regular operations and normal business hours beginning Aug. 23 with the exception of the Weekend Acute Care Clinic (WACC), which will not be reinstated at this time.

    This decision follows Department of Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel’s announcement last week that civilian workforce furloughs were being cut from 11 to six days.  

    “As we look ahead to fiscal year 2014, less than two months away, the Department of Defense still faces major fiscal challenges. If Congress does not change the Budget Control Act, DoD will be forced to cut an additional $52 billion in FY 2014, starting on October 1. This represents 40 percent more than this year’s sequester-mandated cuts of $37 billion. Facing this uncertainty, I cannot be sure what will happen next year, but I want to assure our civilian employees that we will do everything possible to avoid more furloughs,” Hagel said in a statement released by the U.S. Department of Defense.

    “I want to thank our civilian workers for their patience and dedication during these extraordinarily tough times, and for their continued service and devotion to our department and our country. I know how difficult this has been for all of you and your families. Your contribution to national security is invaluable, and I look forward to one day putting this difficult period behind us,” Hagel said.

    Col. Patricia Darnauer, CRDAMC commander, said she’s thankful furloughs have been shortened and pleased with the medical center staff and providers for ensuring operations were only minimally impacted.

    “The furlough period has been a challenge, but CRDAMC’s Soldiers, Civilians and Contractors really pulled together to keep our medical center running while ensuring our beneficiaries continued to receive the superior healthcare they deserve. I am proud of the staff’s commitment and resourcefulness,” she said.

    While the medical center gets ready to return to normal hours and operations, the WACC won’t be back at this time. That decision was made after taking a hard look at the bottom line and anticipated long-term budget cuts Darnauer said.

    “At this point in time, it was determined the WACC couldn’t be sustained,” she said. “In order to maintain our stringent standards of care during this challenging time we need to embrace changes that have the least impact on direct patient care.”

    Alternative resources will still be available for those who need acute care over weekends. Those resources include the CRDAMC Emergency Department where beneficiaries can receive care 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The Nurse Advice Line at 254-553-3695, is another resource which allows beneficiaries to speak one-on-one with a registered nurse to receive guidance on care that can be given at home and/or when to seek care at a medical facility.

    “Above all, I want to thank our beneficiaries for their patience and continued support during these trying times,” Darnauer said. “Our fiscal environment is changing, but we will work to remain flexible, adaptable and responsible to continue to meet our patients’ healthcare needs.”

     – 30 –

     stock image furlough news

    stock image provided by CRDAMC Public Affairs

  • FORT HOOD, Texas - Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center will hold this year's annual Sports Physical Clinics July 27 and September 7 from 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. at the Thomas Moore Health Clinic at Fort Hood.

    Only Tricare Prime beneficiaries ages 4 - 18 years enrolled to CRDAMC clinics are eligible to participate in the Sports Physical Clinics. All participants are required to make an appointment prior to the event. Walk-ins will be redirected to their primary care clinics. Appointments are anticipated to be approximately two hours long from beginning to end.

    Routine childhood immunizations will not be offered during the Sports Physical Clinics this year. Parents should contact their primary care clinics to receive information on immunizations.

    Children with appointments must be accompanied by a parent or guardian and should be dressed in comfortable gym clothing and shoes. Those over the age of 10 must have a DEERS identification card in their name. Parents or guardians of children under the age of 10 will also be required to provide a DEERS identification card. Additionally, participants need to bring a copy of their school's sports physical form and their immunization record.

    The Killeen Parks and Recreation Department does not require sports physicals for participation. Killeen and Copperas Cove Independent School Districts only require sports physicals for students who are entering 7th, 9th or 11th grade unless there has been a change in the student's medical condition since their last examination. Fort Hood Child and Youth Services require physicals for children of all ages in order to participate in activities.

    To schedule an appointment for the Sports Physical Clinics please call the Carl. R. Darnall Army Medical Center Appointments line at (254) 288-8888 from 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Monday - Friday.

    -30-

     

    2013 CRDAMC Sports Physical Clinic

     

     

     

     

    -30-

  • By Brandy Gill, CRDAMC Public Affairs

    FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center welcomed Col. Patricia Darnauer, the new hospital commander during an Assumption of Command ceremony June 28 at the main hospital entrance in front of the flag pole.

    Colonel Darnauer, a native of Poughquag, N. Y., assumed command from Col. (Dr.) Roger A. Gallup, who has been the interim CRDAMC commander since Brig. Gen. Patrick Sargent relinquished command two months ago.

    During the ceremony, Maj. Gen. Jimmie Keenan, commanding general of Southern Regional Medical Command and the reviewing official for the ceremony, thanked Gallup for stepping up and temporarily leading CRDAMC.

    “You have done a phenomenal job,” she said. “You saw CRDAMC through the Joint Commission inspection during which CRDAMC was recognized as an outstanding facility. We appreciate your efforts.”

    Darnauer also thanked Gallup for his leadership while commanding the hospital for the past two months.

    “Your professionalism and calm demeanor created the environment that contributed significantly to CRDAMC’s recent successes,” she said.

    Gallup will stay with the medical center and resume his position as the top doctor and Deputy Commander of Clinical Services.

    Darnauer is no stranger to Fort Hood or the medical center since she served here earlier in her career as the Administrative Resident and Chief, Clinical Support Division.

    “I first came to Darnall Army Community Hospital as the Army-Baylor resident. During my two years under Colonel, later Maj. Gen. Ken Farmer’s command, I cut my teeth on Army Medicine,” she said.

    Darnauer has had many assignments since her first tour at CRDAMC including commanding the 115th Combat Support Hospital (CSH) from Fort Polk, La. She deployed the CSH and served as the Task Force Medical-Southwest/West commander based at Camp Dwyer, Afghanistan. While there, she led a multi-compo force arrayed across two-plus regional commands providing Role 1 through Role 3 care to U.S. and coalition forces as well as Afghan partners and critically injured Afghan civilians.

    Most recently, she served as the Director for Human Resources, Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army Medical Command G-1.

    While her career has included many interesting assignments Darnauer said she is pleased with her return to The Great Place.

    “For me, my return to Fort Hood is one I greatly anticipated,” she said. “Two weeks ago, I returned to Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and witnessed this organization’s terrific performance as the Joint Commission inspected our health system. I could not have asked for a better welcome than to observe as the CRDAMC team excelled under the pressures of this external review.”

    Now, as the CRDAMC commander, Darnauer says she is looking forward to helping the medical center’s Soldiers and staff move forward.

    “My goal is to refine and hardwire the process (you’ve) already established so that in 2015 as we will transition to the new, state-of-the-art hospital rising across the parking lot, we continue providing great care to our Warriors, Veterans and Family members.”

    Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center supports more than 50,000 active duty personnel and more than 125,000 family members and retirees within a 40-mile radius with a staff of over 4,000 Soldier, civilian and contract employees. Daily, the medical center averages about 5,180 outpatient appointments, 26 surgeries, eight births, 201 emergency room visits; and its pharmacies fill about 5,000 prescriptions.

     – 30 –

     Darnauer AoC 28 Jun 2012

    From left: Col. Patricia Darnauer, incoming CRDAMC commander, Maj. Gen. Jimmie Keenan, commanding general Southern Regional Medical Command, and Col. Roger Gallup, CRDAMC deputy commander of clinical services and interim commander, stand in formation during the Aussumption of Command ceremony held June 28 at the medical center (Photo by Kim Kamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs).

    Darnauer AoC 28 Jun 2013 v2

    Colonel Patricia Darnauer, incoming CRDAMC commander, addresses the audience during her Assumption of Command ceremony as medical center Soldiers in formation look on (Photo by Kim Zamarripa, CRDAMC Public Affairs).

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and its primary care clinics will modify operating hours in observance of the 4th of July federal holiday.  The hospital remains open every day for emergency services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

    Primary and Urgent Care Services

    Thursday, July 4

    The following clinics are closed: Russell L. Collier Health Clinic, Monroe Health Clinic, Troop Medical Clinic 12, Bennett Health Clinic, Family Medicine Residency Clinic and the Killeen, Harker Heights and Copperas Cove Medical Homes.

    Care for acute health problems is available at the Weekend Acute Care Clinic at the Thomas Moore Health Clinic on 58th Street and 761st Battalion Avenue. The clinic is open for walk-in urgent care from 8 - 10 a.m. and 1 - 3 p.m. This clinic is for active-duty Soldiers and TRICARE Prime enrollees assigned to Thomas Moore, Bennett, Collier, Family Medicine Residency Clinic, Killeen Medical Home, Copperas Cove Medical Home, Harker Heights Medical Home, Pediatrics, and the Troop Medical Clinics.

    Friday, July 5

    Thomas Moore and the Family Medicine Residency Clinic will be open July 5 from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Beneficiaries assigned to any of the Department of Family and Community Medicine clinics may call Patient Appointing Service at (254) 288-8888 for an appointment.

    Saturday, July 6 & Sunday, July 7

    Care for acute health problems is available at the Weekend Acute Care Clinic at the Thomas Moore Health Clinic on 58th Street and 761st Battalion Avenue. The clinic is open for walk-in urgent care from 8 - 10 a.m. and 1 - 3 p.m. This clinic is for active-duty Soldiers and TRICARE Prime enrollees assigned to Thomas Moore, Bennett, Collier, Family Medicine Residency Center, Killeen Medical Home, Copperas Cove Medical Home, Harker Heights Medical Home, Pediatrics, and the Troop Medical Clinics.

    During the holiday period from July 4 – 7, Internal Medicine TRICARE Prime enrollees with urgent care needs should go to the Emergency Department.

    The Patient Appointment Service, (254) 288-8888, is open from 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Friday, July 5, closed Saturday and Sunday, and will resume services Monday, July 8. Darnall and its clinics will also resume normal opening hours Monday, July 8.

    Nurse Advice Line

    Darnall’s Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (254) 553-3695. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area entitled to military healthcare may talk to registered nurses about urgent health issues, guidance on non-emergency situations, and information about self-care for injuries or illnesses.

    Pharmacies

    CRDAMC’s Main Outpatient Pharmacy will be closed July 4. The Main pharmacy will be open July 5-7 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    The Thomas Moore Health Clinic pharmacy will be open July 4th from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., July 5th from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., and July 6th and 7 th from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    – 30 –

     

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center will hold an Assumption of Command ceremony Friday at 8:30 a.m. at the main hospital entrance in front of the flag pole, for Col. Patricia Darnauer, the incoming CRDAMC commander.

    Col. Darnauer will assume command from Col. Roger Gallup, who has been the interim CRDAMC commander since Col. (P) Patrick Sargent relinquished command in April of this year.

    Maj. Gen. Jimmie Keenan, commanding general of Southern Regional Medical Command, will be the reviewing officer for the ceremony.

    In the case of inclement weather the ceremony will be held at Abrams Gymnasium on 62nd Street and Support Ave. (Bldg. 23001).

    Media interested in attending the ceremony should contact CRDAMC Public Affairs at 254-553-1870, 254-288-8005 or 254-338-6087 no later than 4:30 p.m. Thursday for meeting time and location.

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center and its primary care clinics will modify operating hours in observance of the Memorial Day federal holiday Monday, May 27th.  The hospital remains open every day for emergency services, inpatient care, and labor and delivery services.

    Primary and Urgent Care Services

    Friday, 24 May, is a III Corps Training Holiday.

    • Bennett Heath Clinic:
      • Friday, 24 May, the clinic will be open from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (The last patient seen at 4 p.m.)
      • The clinic will be closed Saturday, Sunday and Monday (May. 25 – 27).
    • Thomas Moore Health Clinic:
      • Friday, 24 May, the clinic will be open from 7 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    • Weekend Acute Care will be available at this clinic Saturday, Sunday and Monday (May. 25 – 27) from 8 a.m. - 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. - 3 p.m.
    • Russell L. Collier Health Clinic
      • Friday, 24 May, the clinic is open from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
      • This clinic will be closed Saturday, Sunday and Monday (May. 25 – 27).
    • TMC 12 and Monroe Health Clinic are closed. Sick Call will be available at Thomas Moore Health Clinic

    From Saturday through Monday, care for acute health problems is available at the Weekend Acute Care Clinic at the Thomas Moore Health Clinic on 58th Street and 761st Battalion Avenue. The clinic is open for walk-in urgent care from 8 - 10 a.m. and 1 - 3 p.m. This clinic is for active-duty Soldiers and TRICARE Prime enrollees assigned to Thomas Moore, Bennett, Collier, Family Medicine Residency Center, Killeen Medical Home, Copperas Cove Medical Home, Harker Heights Medical Home, Pediatrics, and the Troop Medical Clinics.

    The Pediatric Clinic, located at the corner of 761st Battalion Ave. and 31st Street, will be open from 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. on Friday, for acute care appointments and closed on Monday. Please call 288-8888 to make an appointment.

    During the holiday period from May 25-27, Internal Medicine TRICARE Prime enrollees with urgent care needs should go to the Emergency Department.

    The Patient Appointment Service, 288-8888, is open from 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Friday, May 24, closed Saturday, Sunday and Monday, and will resume services Tuesday, May 28th.

    Darnall and its clinics will resume normal opening hours on Tuesday, May 28th.

    Nurse Advice Line

    Darnall’s Nurse Advice Line is available 24/7 by calling (254) 553-3695. Individuals living in the Fort Hood area entitled to military healthcare may talk to registered nurses about urgent health issues, guidance on non-emergency situations, and information about self-care for injuries or illnesses.

    Pharmacies

    CRDAMC’s Main Outpatient Pharmacy will be open from 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. May 24-25. The Main Outpatient Pharmacy will be closed May 26-27.

    The Thomas Moore Health Clinic pharmacy will be open from 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Friday. It will then be open from 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday - Monday.

    The Bennett and Collier (West Ford Hood) Health Clinics will be open from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Friday and closed on Monday.

    The Monroe Pharmacy will be closed all four days: May 24-27.

    All pharmacies return to normal operating hours on Tuesday, May 28.

    – 30 –

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas — Beneficiaries of Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center are now able to communicate online with their primary care provider through secure messaging.

    This capability will, for the first time, provide patients the ability to communicate directly with their provider and care teams and allow care teams a two-way flow of communication with individual patients or groups of patients.

    The U.S. Army Medical Command is implementing the use of Army Medicine Secure Messaging Service (AMSMS) by offering it to 100 percent of beneficiaries who receive care in the "direct care" system by the end of 2014.

    AMSMS is a web-based, secure-messaging application that provides a comprehensive set of services designed to allow patients and their healthcare team to communicate securely and conveniently. The application works like an on-line secure banking web site, so beneficiaries can be assured of the integrity of their personal healthcare information.

    Patients of Killeen Medical Home, Harker Heights Medical Home, Copperas Cove Medical Home, Thomas Moore Health Clinic, Russell Collier Health Clinic, Bennett Health Clinic, and the Family Medical Residency Clinic are now able to sign up for the secure messaging service. 

    According to Dr. Terry Newton M.D., information technology clinical capability manager, MEDCOM, "AMSMS is an easy-to-use secure communication tool that has the potential to significantly impact care to beneficiaries by engaging them in convenient ways and times to build relationships, improve access to information and reduce the need for so many visits to their primary care clinic."

    "Secure messaging is a critical tool in helping Army Medicine achieve the [Military Health System] Quadruple Aim of improving the patient's experience, and improving population health and readiness while reducing per capita costs," Newton said.

    With online services from AMSMS, patients can to book appointments, request and review lab/test results, request medication refills, request a referral, email their physician a question and schedule web visits with their provider. Additionally, patients will have access to a fully integrated electronic personal health record and an extensive collection of multi-media educational content through AMSMS. Army Medicine's goal is to provide the secure messaging service to all beneficiaries who receive care in military treatment facilities by the end of 2014.

    To register for online services, beneficiaries should visit with their healthcare team administrator or call their primary care clinic for more details.

    – 30 –