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13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary)

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  • The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) is scheduled to host a Memorial Wreath Laying Ceremony at Hildner Field at 10 a.m. on Friday, Sept. 26, as part of the unit’s 49th Birthday Week celebration.

    Media is invited to the Wreath Laying Ceremony with the option of participating in a follow on cake cutting reception.

    Media members interested in attending the ceremony please RSVP no later than 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 25, with Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) Public Affairs, at 254-618-8916 or jason.d.thompson68.mil@mail.mil. Gate time for the ceremony will be 9:15 on Friday at the Marvin Leath Visitor’s Center designated media parking lot.

    The 13th SC(E) is celebrating the unit's 49th birthday during the week of Sept. 25-27.

    The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) was activated at Ford Hood as the 13th Support Brigade in September 1965. As the nation's involvement in Vietnam was increasing, this brigade was formed and tasked with training technical services units to assume combat service support missions in Southeast Asia.

    The command continued to evolve due to increased missions and changing roles, and, along with similar units, was redesignated as the 13th Support Command (Corps) in 1980, then as the 13th Corps Support Command (COSCOM) in March 1989. As part of Army Transformation, the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) was reflagged in its current configuration on Feb. 16, 2006.

    The command’s primary missions are to provide command and control of assigned, attached and operational control (OPCON) units, and to plan for and provide sustainment (supply, maintenance, and field services), distribution, and health service support for full spectrum operations.

Headlines

  • The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) is scheduled to host a Memorial Wreath Laying Ceremony at Hildner Field at 10 a.m. on Friday, Sept. 26, as part of the unit’s 49th Birthday Week celebration.

    Media is invited to the Wreath Laying Ceremony with the option of participating in a follow on cake cutting reception.

    Media members interested in attending the ceremony please RSVP no later than 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 25, with Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) Public Affairs, at 254-618-8916 or jason.d.thompson68.mil@mail.mil. Gate time for the ceremony will be 9:15 on Friday at the Marvin Leath Visitor’s Center designated media parking lot.

    The 13th SC(E) is celebrating the unit's 49th birthday during the week of Sept. 25-27.

    The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) was activated at Ford Hood as the 13th Support Brigade in September 1965. As the nation's involvement in Vietnam was increasing, this brigade was formed and tasked with training technical services units to assume combat service support missions in Southeast Asia.

    The command continued to evolve due to increased missions and changing roles, and, along with similar units, was redesignated as the 13th Support Command (Corps) in 1980, then as the 13th Corps Support Command (COSCOM) in March 1989. As part of Army Transformation, the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) was reflagged in its current configuration on Feb. 16, 2006.

    The command’s primary missions are to provide command and control of assigned, attached and operational control (OPCON) units, and to plan for and provide sustainment (supply, maintenance, and field services), distribution, and health service support for full spectrum operations.

  • Janie Fogg places the rank of brigadier general onto her husband Rodney Fogg, commanding general of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), during a promotion ceremony in his honor at the 13th SC(E)'s Hildner Field Sept. 18. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO)   Maj. Gen. Kendall Cox, deputy commander of III Corps and Fort Hood, administers the officer’s oath to the newly promoted Brig. Gen. Rodney Fogg, commanding general of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), at a ceremony in Fogg’s honor Sept. 18 at 13th SC(E)’s Hildner Field. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO)   Brig. Gen. Rodney Fogg, the commanding general of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), thanks his family, friends, and Soldiers for attending his promotion ceremony at Hildner Field Sept. 18. Fogg’s family and friends traveled from across the country to witness the monumental achievement for the newly promoted general officer. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO)


    By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson

    13th SC(E) PAO

    FORT HOOD, Texas -- The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) hosted a promotion ceremony in honor of their commander Sept. 18 at the command's Hildner Field.

    During the ceremony, Col. Rodney Fogg was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General. His wife, Janie, daughters, Rachal, Katie and Erin, and father, Ray, were on hand to instill Fogg’s new rank on his uniform.

    “It was an honor to promote Rodney,” said Ray Fogg, who previously served as a noncommissioned officer in the Marine Corps. “I’ve always told Rodney that he could accomplish anything if he set out to do so.”

    Brig. Gen. Fogg said that he is always honored to have his family present for these special moments and was quick to credit his family for his success.

    “My parents had a strong influence in my success, as a result of their mentorship and the strong upbringing I had as a child,” said the newly promoted Fogg. “My wife, Janie, and my daughters, they’ve been the greatest in helping support me in my career through the years, and I could not have made it this far without them.”

    Brig. Gen. Fogg is a native of Castlewood, Virginia. He received his bachelor's degree from King College in Bristol, Tennessee, and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Quartermaster Corps from East Tennessee State University in 1987.

    During his 27 years in the Army, Brig. Gen. Fogg has served as a platoon leader and battalion personnel officer with the 19th Maintenance Battalion, Giessen, West Germany; company commander of the 102nd Quartermaster Company (POL), 561st Corps Support Battalion, Fort Campbell, Kentucky; logistics officer for the 3rd Battalion, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne), at Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia.

    Additionally, he’s served as the materiel readiness officer at 101st Airborne Division Support Command, followed by the support operations and executive officer of the 526th Forward Support Battalion, Fort Campbell. Following his time At Fort Campbell, Brig. Gen. Fogg served as the international logistics officer, executive assistant, and chief of logistics plans for U.S. Pacific Command, Camp Smith, Hawaii.

    He has held several positions of command including 17th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion at Fort Richardson, Alaska; 49th Quartermaster Group (POL) at Fort Lee, Virginia; and now the 13th SC(E).

    Brig. Gen. Fogg has deployed to Somalia in support of Operation Provide Hope, Haiti in support of Operation Uphold Democracy, and twice to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    Currently, Fogg is leading the 13th SC(E) as the unit prepares for its next mission to serve as the logistics hub for the Central Command area of operations when they deploy to Kuwait later this year.

    He said that he hopes to instill some of his leadership philosophy into his command as they prepare for their upcoming deployment. “When we get ready to go out the door, I want to make sure that my Soldiers are disciplined and trained, ready for any task that comes our way,” said Fogg. “When you’re not disciplined, you start to get complacent, start making mistakes, and that’s when you start getting hurt and are unable to perform your mission.”

    Video highlights are available at the 13th SC(E) DVIDS page at http://www.dvidshub.net/video/361661/13th-esc-commander-promoted-brig-general 

  • Commanders and senior noncommissioned officers from the 4th Sustainment Brigade and subordinate commands stand prepared to case the unit’s colors on Sept. 9.  The casing of the colors symbolizes the departing of the unit from Fort Hood en route to the Afghanistan Theater. Once the brigade assumes their mission in Afghanistan, the colors will once again be unfurled and proudly displayed.   Col. Timothy Luedecking and Command Sgt. Maj. Alton Haney, the command team for 4th Sustainment Brigade, showoff the Belton City flag during a deployment ceremony Sept. 9. Jay Taggert, the Military Liaison for Belton’s Chamber of Commerce, presented the flag to the unit’s leadership as a token of appreciation for the ongoing partnership between the two organizations.   Sgt. Adam Erlewein, a public affairs specialist with 4th Sustainment Brigade, says goodbye to his wife, Anely Erlewein, before he leaves for his nine-month deployment to Afghanistan. Family and friends of the departing Soldiers arrived early in the morning to show their support and see their Soldier one last time before the unit’s departure.

    4th Sust. Bde. ‘Wrangler’ Soldiers deploy to Afghanistan

    Story and photos by 2nd Lt. Rebecca Burkhart

    4th Sust. Bde. PAO

    FORT HOOD, Texas – Approximately 150 Soldiers from 4th Sustainment Brigade’s Headquarters and the 4th Special Troops Battalion gathered at the brigade’s headquarters building Sept. 9 to bid farewell to their Families and friends as they cased the unit’s colors and departed for a nine-month deployment in Afghanistan.

    The brigade will spend their time in Afghanistan providing retrograde and sustainment support operations for Soldiers and Coalition Partners in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Family members and friends of the deploying Soldiers as well as Soldiers from the brigade’s rear detachment arrived early in the morning to show their support at a meaningful deployment ceremony.

    Col. Timothy Luedecking, commander of the 4th Sus. Bde., took to the podium during the ceremony to speak about the unit’s departure.

    “I don’t want you to worry. These soldiers that stand before you are the best trained because they’re in the best unit in the United States Army,” said Luedecking, as he addressed the crowd. “We will take care of your Soldiers just like they’re our Family.”

    The ceremony began with the playing of the National Anthem and a brief prayer given by the brigade chaplain. Following a recap of the organization’s history, commanders and senior noncommissioned officers stood before the formation to case the unit’s colors, a traditional display that symbolizes the unit’s departure from Fort Hood.

    “Your brother, your mother, your sister, cousin, uncles, sons and daughters, we will do our very best to make sure we return them in the same shape as you see them in this morning and hopefully, in better shape,” said Luedecking, during the conclusion of his heartfelt speech. “Godspeed to all of you. We will see you in a short nine months back here on Fort Hood, and we will bring your loved ones back to you”.

    The ceremony concluded with last minute goodbyes to Family and friends before the Soldiers loaded a caravan of buses to depart for the airport.

  • FORT HOOD, Texas -- The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) will host a retirement ceremony in honor of Maj. Gen. Michael J. Terry at the command's Hildner Field on Friday, Aug. 15 at 9 a.m.

    Terry is a former commanding general of 13th Corps Support Command, later redesignated as the 13th SC(E), where he deployed to New Orleans and Southwest Louisiana in support of humanitarian relief efforts after hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and then to Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom Rotation 06-08.

    Terry's most recent assignment was as the commanding general for U.S. Army Tank Automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM) Life Cycle Management Command headquartered in Warren, Mi., responsible for unifying all of the organizations that focus on the development, procurement and sustainment of Soldier and Ground Systems for the Army.

    For media interested in attending the ceremony, please RSVP with Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO, jason.d.thompson68.mil@mail.mil, no later than noon on Aug. 13. Gate time for the event will be on Friday at 8:15 a.m.

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    Courtesy 407th AFSB

    FORT HOOD – The 407th Army Field Support Brigade welcomed its newest commander during a Change of Command Ceremony on Hildner Field on July 24.

    Col.  Steven L. Allen, relinquished command to Col. Steven S. DeBusk during the ceremony.

    DeBusk, a career logistics officer, is arriving for his first tour of duty on Fort Hood. He comes to the 407th AFSB after most recently serving as the deputy chief, Depots and Arsenals Division, U.S. Army Materiel Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala.  

    Allen took command of the 407th AFSB in July 2012, while the unit was undergoing major restructuring to include gaining mission command of eight assigned Directorate of Logistics which grew to 11 DOL’s in 2013. In October, the DOL “name” was changed to the Logistics Readiness Center (LRC) per direction from the Army Materiel Command.   Allen leaves Fort Hood to serve as the J4 for the U.S. Special Operations Command.

    Additionally, Command Sgt. Maj. Nathaniel Richardson relinquished responsibility as the senior enlisted leader of the command to Command Sgt. Maj. Jackson L. Jackson.

    Richardson is set to retire from the military after proudly serving our country for over 30yrs.  

    Tracy L. Jackson will also assume responsibilities as the new Brigade Command Sergeant Major of the 407th ASFB. Jackson, and his wife Carla, are on their first tour of duty on Fort Hood as well. Jackson joins the 407th AFSB after most recently serving as the 6th Ordnance Battalion’s command sergeant major at Camp Carroll, Korea.

  • 13th SC(E) hosts Change of Command Ceremony

    Unit bids farewell to Maj. Gen. LeMasters, welcome Col. Fogg

    Col. Rodney D. Fogg accepts the unit colors of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) from Lt. Gen. Mark. A. Milley, commanding general of III Corps and Fort Hood, at Hildner Field July 23 signifying his assumption as the new commander of the 13th SC(E). Maj. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., relinquished the command of 13th SC(E) to Fogg. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO)  Col. Rodney D. Fogg accepts the unit colors of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) from Lt. Gen. Mark. A. Milley, commanding general of III Corps and Fort Hood, at Hildner Field July 23 signifying his assumption as the new commander of the 13th SC(E). Maj. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., relinquished the command of 13th SC(E) to Fogg. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Jason Kucera, 13th SC(E) PAO)  Maj. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., provides his closing remarks to the Soldiers, families and friends of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) at Hildner Field July 23 after relinquishing his command of the unit to Col. Rodney D. Fogg. LeMasters next assignment will be with the Army Material Command in Redstone Arsenal, Ala. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO)

    The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) hosted a change of command ceremony on Hildner Field July 23 to bid adieu to one senior leader, and welcome another.

    Maj. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., relinquished his position as the commanding general to Col. Rodney D. Fogg during the ceremony.

    “Clark LeMasters is the epitome of a selfless team player,” said Lt. Gen. Mark. A. Milley, the commanding general of III Corps and Fort Hood. “He is a humble and loyal subordinate, and he is extraordinarily compassionate and places the interests of his Soldiers, their families, and the unit constantly ahead of himself. He’s mastered that balance, which very few others have.”

    LeMasters will move onto his next assignment at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., as the deputy chief of staff for logistics and operations for Army Materiel Command where Fogg was most recently serving as the executive officer to the commanding general for AMC. 

  • FORT HOOD – The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) will welcome its newest commanding general during a change of command ceremony on Hildner Field here July 23 at 9 a.m. Maj. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters Jr., will relinquish command to Col. (P) Rodney D. Fogg during the ceremony. Fogg, a career quartermaster officer, is arriving for his first tour of duty on Fort Hood. He is coming to the 13th SC(E) after most recently serving as the executive officer to the commanding general, U.S. Army Materiel Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala. LeMasters took command of the 13th SC(E) in March 2012 while the unit was deployed to Operation Enduring Freedom and spent the first seven months conducting logistics training and mentoring of Afghan partners as the Deputy Command of Support Operations, NATO Training Mission – Afghanistan. LeMasters leaves Fort Hood to serve as deputy chief of staff for logistics and operations for the U.S. Army Materiel Command. For media interested in attending the ceremony, please RSVP with Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) Public Affairs Office, jason.d.thompson68.mil@mail.mil or at (254) 288-7342, no later than 4 p.m. on Tuesday, July 22.
  • Cricket LeMasters, spouse of Maj. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, the commanding general of 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), pins the rank of major general onto her husband during his promotion ceremony at Hildner Field July 11. Maj. Gen. LeMasters will relinquish command of the 13th SC(E) July 23 as he prepares to assume his new role at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., as the deputy chief of staff for logistics and operations for Army Materiel Command. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO) Lt. Gen. Mark A. Milley (left), commanding general of III Corps and Fort Hood, presents a certificate of promotion to Maj. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, the commanding general of 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), following his promotion at the unit's Hildner Field July 11. LeMasters' Family, from left, Faye LeMasters, Maj. Gen. LeMasters' mother, Cricket LeMasters, spouse, Lauren LeMasters, daughter, and Steven LeMasters, son, was on hand to celebrate the occasion. Maj. Gen. LeMasters will relinquish command of the 13th SC(E) July 23 as he prepares to assume his new role at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., as the deputy chief of staff for logistics and operations for Army Materiel Command. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO)

    FORT HOOD, Texas -- The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) hosted a promotion ceremony in honor of Maj. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the commanding general of 13th SC(E), at the unit's Hildner Field July 11.

    LeMasters was promoted from the rank of brigadier general as he prepares to move onto his next assignment at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., as the deputy chief of staff for logistics and operations for Army Materiel Command.

    "The unit has done amazing things, it has shaped my thinking as an officer in the time that I've spent here, the unique challenges that I've had, the most important thing," said LeMasters. "Particularly, as I move onto my next job, it's refocused me, on something our boss has told us; the most important thing we can focus on as a Corps, that's combat readiness. The Soldiers, noncommissioned officers, warrant officers, who have taken us under their wings, who have trained us, we stand on their shoulders. The awards and the accolades we get are due to their hard sweat, their hard work."

    A B-Roll video package from the ceremony is available online at http://www.dvidshub.net/video/348984/13th-sce-commanding-general-promoted-maj-gen.

  • New 13th SC(E) commander announced

    13th SC(E) Public Affairs Office

    The Chief of Staff of the Army announced today the assignment of Col. (P) Rodney D. Fogg as the incoming commander for the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary).

    “Colonel (Promotable) Rodney D. Fogg, Executive Officer to the Commanding General, United States Army Materiel Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama to Commander, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), Fort Hood, Texas.”

    The 13th SC(E) is scheduled to host a change of command ceremony between Brig. Gen. (P) Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the outgoing commander of 13th SC(E), and Fogg on July 23 at Hildner Field.

    Media interested in attending the ceremony, please RSVP with Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) Public Affairs Office, jason.d.thompson68.mil@mail.mil, no later than noon on July 18.

  • 13th SC(E) commander to pin second star

    FORT HOOD, Texas -- The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) will host a promotion ceremony for Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the commanding general of 13th SC(E), at 9 a.m. July 11 at the command's Hildner Field.

    LeMasters assumed command of the 13th SC(E) in March 2012 while the unit was deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

    For media interested in attending the ceremony, please RSVP with Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) Public Affairs Office, jason.d.thompson68.mil@mail.mil, no later than 10 a.m. on Thursday, July 10.

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – The 1st Medical Brigade will host a change of command ceremony on Friday, June 27 at 1 p.m. at Sadowski Field. During the ceremony, the commander of the 1st Med. Bde., Col. Bertram Providence, will transfer his command to Col. Allan Darden, Sr.

    The 1st Medical Brigade provides command and control to more than 3,000 soldiers located throughout four installations; Fort Hood, Texas, Fort Bliss, Texas, Fort Carson, Colo., and Fort Polk, La. This deployable brigade supports the Soldiers assigned to III Corps, Fort Hood, Texas.

    Media interested in attending the event should RSVP to Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson at jason.d.thompson68.mil@mail.mil not later than noon on June 26 and meet the public affairs escorts at the Marvin Leath visitor’s center designated media parking area, outside of the Bernie Back Gate at noon on June 27.

  • Wrangler Food Service Specialists to compete in Army-level food service competition

    Food Service Specialists from the 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), will represent the U.S. Army Forces Command in the Department of the Army-level 46th Annual Philip A. Connelly Award for Food Service Excellence competition, in the company-level field team category, using the Mobile Kitchen Trailer (MKT) or Containerized Kitchen (CK) and preparing a breakfast and lunch meal in the field.

    The event will take place on Feb. 13. During this advanced phase of the competition, our Soldiers compete against Soldiers representing other major Army commands (MACOMS). Inspectors will travel to each winning MACOM location and inspect their respective teams. Teams will be inspected on standards in the areas of food preparation and serving, site setup, field sanitation, maintenance, training and administration.

    The overall goal of the program is to promote and improve professionalism in the Army Food Service, encourage and recognize excellence in the food service profession and reward individuals for stellar management practices.

    Winners of the DA-level competition will receive a trophy from the Department of the Army G4 and coins and certificates from the Quartermaster General and Joint Culinary Center of Excellence (JCCoE) located at Fort Lee, Va. The food operations sergeant of the team will receive a Connelly Ring (similar to a super bowl ring), and two Soldiers of the team will receive attendance to a residential or virtual culinary institute to further their civilian education and certification.

    Media will have the opportunity to visit the site around lunch time, and observe the preparations and the serving of a lunch meal and will have a chance to interview participants. Media interested in covering the story should RSVP by noon on 12 Feb. Gate time for the event is 10:15 a.m. on 13 Feb. Media will be transported to and from the field site via military vans, since privately owned vehicles are not allowed in our training areas. Unfortunately, we cannot accommodate satellite trucks for this event.

    For more information and RSVPs contact Sgt. 1st Class Jason Kucera at jason.d.kucera.mil@mail.mil or 254-288-6410/7342.

     

  • FORT HOOD, Texas- The Headquarters company, 1st Support Battalion will case its colors in preparation to deploy about 60 Soldiers to the Sinai Peninsula to assume duties part of the Multinational Force and Observer mission. The majority of the Soldiers departing for the mission are assigned to the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary).

    The ceremony will be at the Soldier Ministry Center across from the 13th SC (E) HQ's.

    Gate time for media will be outside the Bernie Beck Gate, by the Marvin Leath Visitor's Center media lot on Jan. 16 at 8:30 a.m. Any media outlet desiring to bring a satellite truck must confirm ahead of time to ensure access.

    Contact Sgt. 1st Class Jason Kucera for questions and to confirm media coverage at 254-288-7342 or jason.d.kucera.mil@mail.mil or Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson at jason.d.thompson68.mil@mail.mil.


    For more information on the mission refer to the previously released media advisory dated Jan. 14.

    FORT HOOD, Texas- III Corps announced today that a company sized task force from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) will deploy about 60 Soldiers to the Sinai Peninsula to assume duties as the Headquarters Company for the U.S. 1st Support Battalion as part of the Multinational Force and Observer mission.

     

    They will replace members from the North Carolina and Puerto Rico National Guard during their nine month deployment.

     

    The Headquarters Company provides command, control, administration, and logistics support to the battalion as well as many services to the entire Force. Such services include a chaplain, U.S. military postal services, mortuary affairs services, and ammunition and explosive storage.

     

    The U.S. 1st Support BN provides direct logistical support to the twelve partnered nations that comprise the MFO contingent; Australia, Canada, Colombia, the Czech Republic, the Republic of the Fiji Islands, France, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, and Uruguay.

     

    The MFO is an independent international organization, with peacekeeping responsibilities in the Sinai.  The origins of the MFO lie in Annex I to the 1979 Treaty of Peace between Egypt and Israel.  In 1981, the Treaty of Parties negotiated a Protocol that established the MFO and defined its mission.

     

    The mission of the MFO is to supervise the implementation of the security provisions of the Egyptian-Israeli Treaty of Peace and employ best efforts to prevent any violations of its terms.

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – III Corps announced today that a company sized task force from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) will deploy about 60 Soldiers to the Sinai Peninsula to assume duties as the Headquarters Company for the U.S. 1st Support Battalion as part of the Multinational Force and Observer mission.

     

    They will replace members from the North Carolina and Puerto Rico National Guard during their nine month deployment.

     

    The Headquarters Company provides command, control, administration, and logistics support to the battalion as well as many services to the entire Force. Such services include a chaplain, U.S. military postal services, mortuary affairs services, and ammunition and explosive storage.

     

    The U.S. 1st Support BN provides direct logistical support to the twelve partnered nations that comprise the MFO contingent; Australia, Canada, Colombia, the Czech Republic, the Republic of the Fiji Islands, France, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, and Uruguay.

     

    The MFO is an independent international organization, with peacekeeping responsibilities in the Sinai.  The origins of the MFO lie in Annex I to the 1979 Treaty of Peace between Egypt and Israel.  In 1981, the Treaty of Parties negotiated a Protocol that established the MFO and defined its mission.

     

    The mission of the MFO is to supervise the implementation of the security provisions of the Egyptian-Israeli Treaty of Peace and employ best efforts to prevent any violations of its terms.

     

    For more information concerning Multinational Force and Observers-Sinai, visit their webpage at http://mfo.org/. For more information on the 13th SC(E), contact 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary)  Public Affairs Office at (254) 287-7342.

     


    Learn more about the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary)

    http://www.hood.army.mil/13sce/

    https://www.facebook.com/#!/13ESC

     

     

  • 13th SC(E) implements Virtual Logistics Predeployment Site Survey for NTC/JRTC units

    By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson

    13th SC(E) PAO

    The Support Operations section of 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) is spearheading a Virtual Logistics Predeployment Site Survey initiative which links leaders from the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif., and the Joint Readiness Training Center in Fort Polk, La., with leaders from units who are planning for, or recently completed, training cycles at NTC or JRTC so that all parties could discuss logistics conditions and expectations during a unit’s training cycle.

    The intent of the VLPDSS is to familiarize the incoming leaders with their areas of operation and any issues, challenges, and opportunities that will affect their missions. The incoming unit will use the information gained during the VLPDSS to modify and enhance the predeployment planning and training of their team members.

    The initiative was developed with the mindset of saving the Army and units money without compromising the preparation required to achieve a successful training event.

    “The VLPDSS initiative involves a collaborative effort that will focus on logistics preparation for NTC (or JRTC) rotations,” said Col. John McCoy, the officer in charge of the Support Operations section of the 13th SC(E). “The intent is to link, without the resources required of (temporary duty) travel, incoming and outgoing (Combat Training Center) sustainment participants and discuss pros and cons, lessons learned, best practices, and ideas in order to better prepare units for their future CTC training rotations and increase overall sustainment readiness.”

    The VLPDSS is another extension of the Leveraging Expeditionary Sustainment Commands-West initiative aimed at leveraging expeditionary sustainment assets amongst sustainment units from across the western United States.

    “We’re able to link units together via (video teleconference) to discuss mission requirements and lessons learned from previous NTC rotations so the following unit would be better prepared for what to expect prior to their own rotation,” said Capt. Robert Lewis, the action officer in charge of organizing the VLPDSS sessions. “The PDSS has been part of our rotational calendar for years, but previously, unit leadership would travel to the site, receive a walkthrough of the area and return to their home station to brief the remainder of their unit on the expectations. With the VLPDSS, the units are able to receive the same information without all the expenses associated with traveling to the field site.”

    The most recent VLPDSS was held in December to provide assistance to the 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, which is scheduled for a rotation to NTC in early February. Attending that meeting included senior logisticians from 13th SC(E) and the 4th Sustainment Brigade as well as representatives from NTC and the 1st Bde., 1st Cav. Div.

    “What it does for us is better helps to understand the linkage that comes from the support outside of the brigade,” said Lt. Col. J. Bradley Swift, commander of the 115th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Bde., 1st Cav. Div. “This meeting is a way to coordinate all the logistics and sustainment shareholder actions in support of the brigade’s training objectives.”

    Swift also said that the meeting was an excellent opportunity for him to inquire about additional particulars that would assist his unit in their preparation.

    “The closer you get to your rotation, the quality of your questions get better – more specific and more detailed,” said Swift. “For me this is a perfect zoom level to make sure that I understand the big picture as well as all the fine details. This type of engagement certainly adds value to the sustainment planning efforts.”

    Although the purpose behind the individual meetings is to help prepare the unit that is training up for their CTC rotation, Lewis added that the information shared inside the meeting could also be beneficial to other units elsewhere.

    “We attempt to share our notes with the entire sustainment community,” said Lewis. “If there is something that we’ve seen from the sustainment units that can help train other units before their training objective, we want to make sure they have that information to set them up for success the best we can. We’re always trying to share information as part of being good stewards for the sustainment community.”

  • Command Sgt. Maj. Terry E. Parham, Sr., the outgoing senior enlisted leader of 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), inspects the noncommissioned officer saber before handing it off to Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the commanding general of 13th SC(E), signifying the conclusion of his responsibilities as the command’s senior enlisted leader during a change of responsibility ceremony at Hildner Field Jan. 10. During the ceremony, Parham relinquished his position to incoming Command Sgt. Maj. Terry D. Burton. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO)   Command Sgt. Maj. Terry D. Burton, the incoming command sergeant major for 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), accepts the noncommissioned officer saber from Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the commanding general of 13th SC(E), signifying the assumption of responsibilities as the command’s senior enlisted leader during a change of responsibility ceremony at Hildner Field Jan. 10. During the ceremony, Burton assumed his position from outgoing Command Sgt. Maj. Terry E. Parham, Sr. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO)   Command Sgt. Maj. Terry E. Parham, Sr., the outgoing senior enlisted leader of 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), addresses Soldiers, Families and guests, at a change of responsibility ceremony at Hildner Field Jan. 10. Parham served as the unit’s command sergeant major since Sept. 2011 and will next assume the position as command sergeant major for the Combined Arms Support Command, Fort Lee, Va. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO)   Command Sgt. Maj. Terry D. Burton, the incoming senior enlisted leader of 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), speaks to Soldiers, Families and guests, at a change of responsibility ceremony at Hildner Field Jan. 10. Burton joins the 13th SC(E) after a tour serving as the command sergeant major of the 404th Army Field Support Brigade, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO)   Command Sgt. Maj. Terry D. Burton, the incoming senior enlisted leader of 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), assumes control of the formation of Soldiers from the 13th SC(E) and 4th Sustainment Brigade following a change of responsibility ceremony at Hildner Field Jan. 10. During the ceremony, Burton assumed his position as the unit’s command sergeant major from outgoing Command Sgt. Maj. Terry E. Parham, Sr. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO)

    13th SC(E) hosts change of responsibility ceremony

    By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson

    13th SC(E) PAO

    FORT HOOD, Texas – The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) hosted a change of responsibility ceremony Jan. 10 at Hildner Field here to mark the change of senior enlisted leadership at the command.

    During the ceremony, Soldiers, Families and community partners welcomed Command Sgt. Maj. Terry D. Burton as the newest member of the 13th SC(E) team and bid farewell to outgoing Command Sgt. Maj. Terry E. Parham, Sr.

    “I’ll look back and remember the passionate leadership within the command,” said Parham reflecting on his time with the 13th SC(E). “There’s no mission that cannot be accomplished when you have competent and passionate leadership like here. We have a strong foundation of Soldiers and leaders; the unit is getting a great sergeant major alongside (Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the commanding general of 13th SC(E)); this unit is capable of great things going forward.”

    Parham will depart to Fort Lee, Va., where he will assume the position as command sergeant major for the Combined Arms Support Command.

    Burton joins the 13th SC(E) after a tour serving as the senior enlisted leader of the 404th Army Field Support Brigade at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.

    “As I assume responsibility today, here are the six Army leadership principles I promise to give this command, your Families, the Fort Hood sustainment team, and the cities of Belton and Temple during my tenure.” These are: character, presence, intellect, leading, developing, and achieving, said Burton as he addressed the crowd during the ceremony.

    Burton, originally from Roanoke, Va., joined the military Nov. 9, 1989, as a light wheeled vehicle mechanic and has held positions ranging from senior maintenance supervisor to first sergeant and from battle staff facilitator for United States Army Sergeants Major Academy to command sergeant major with 172nd Support Battalion and the 404th AFSB. Burton has previous overseas tours in Germany, Korea, Jordan, Iraq and Afghanistan.

  • FORT HOOD, Texas –The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) will host a change of responsibility ceremony here on Jan. 10 at 10:00 a.m. at Hildner Field.  During the ceremony, the senior noncommissioned officer advisor of the 13th SC(E), Command Sgt. Maj. Terry E. Parham, will transfer his responsibilities to Command Sgt. Maj. Terry D. Burton.  Parham has been with the unit since 2011, accompanying select Soldiers from the unit to their year-long deployment to Afghanistan from Dec. 2011-Dec. 2012.

    Media interested in covering the event should RSVP to SSG Jason D. Thompson at jason.d.thompson68.mil@mail.mil  not later than Jan. 9, 1:00 p.m., and  meet the public affairs escorts at the Marvin Leath visitor’s center designated media parking area, outside of the Bernie Back Gate at 09:15 a.m. on Jan. 10.  

  • Chief Warrant Officer 2 Marshall Goodman, the battalion maintenance technician with Headquarters Support Company, 615th Aviation Support Battalion, 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, hooks up a Maintenance Support Device to a Caterpillar engine during maintenance training on the engine systems at the Regional Training Site – Maintenance at Fort Hood Dec. 18. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO   Jimmy Lundy, the senior technical instructor for Holt/Caterpillar, based out of San Antonio, reviews error codes with a group of warrant officers attending Caterpillar Engine maintenance training at the Fort Hood Regional Training Site – Maintenance Dec. 18. The training week started with classroom discussions about the Maintenance Support Device and Electronic Training Manuals followed by several days of hands-on practical exercises diagnosing mechanical issues in several different vehicles. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO   Chief Warrant Officer 3 Joseph Thomas, the squadron maintenance technician for Fires “Steel” Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment, diagnoses an engine malfunction during Caterpillar engine maintenance training at the Regional Training Site – Maintenance at Fort Hood Dec. 18. Thomas said the training was beneficial for him to be able to gain a wider understanding of the equipment capabilities. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO

    By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson

    13th SC(E) PAO

    Senior maintenance warrant officers from across several units on Fort Hood attended Caterpillar maintenance training Dec. 16 to 20 at the Regional Training Site – Maintenance here.

    Jimmy Lundy, the senior technical instructor for Holt/Caterpillar, based out of San Antonio, said the training week started with classroom discussions about the Maintenance Support Device and Electronic Training Manuals followed by several days of hands-on practical exercises diagnosing mechanical issues in several different vehicles.

    Lundy said the training was important for the maintenance technicians who had little to no previous experience with the Caterpillar engine systems to have an opportunity to really dig into the systems and gain some firsthand familiarity working on the engine.

    The training was coordinated through the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary)’s Support Operations section by working with the U.S. Army’s Ordnance Regiment’s Chief Warrant Officer, Chief Warrant Officer 5 Terry Hetrick, and Rich Gardner of Caterpillar, according to Chief Warrant Officer 4 Douglas Evans, maintenance chief with the 13th SC(E) SPO’s Materiel Readiness Branch.

    Chief Warrant Officer 3 Joseph Thomas, the squadron maintenance technician for Fires “Steel” Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment, said the training was beneficial for him to be able to gain a wider knowledge of the equipment capabilities.

    “We’ve had this equipment in our motor pools, but now we can have a better understanding of how it works and what it can do for us,” said Thomas. “I can take back this knowledge and share it with my motor sergeants and Soldiers and improve our individual motor pool operations.”

    “This equipment (Maintenance Support Device) will certainly save us both time and money,” Thomas continued. “We can plug in the computer and, through reviewing the codes, we can determine where a fault is located in the engine and repair that part. The alternative would be to dig through the engine in hopes of finding a small issue and if not being able to find that problem having to replace the entire engine. It is simple math; being able to replace a $10 part, versus an entire engine is going to save a lot of money and will save the mechanic a lot of time trying to repair a vehicle. In turn we can get the vehicle back into the fight quicker so the Soldiers can accomplish their missions.”

    Evans said coordinating this training for Fort Hood will be valuable for those warrant officers and well worth the time away from their units.

    “Taking this many warrant officers away from their units is challenging with all of the competing requirements of gunneries, field training and daily operations,” said Evans, however also adding that the training provided will be beneficial for those warrant officers in attendance and their units. “I believe this training will help us diagnose these engines and save the Army money. If we avoid replacing one engine by repairing it, then the training has paid for itself. All of this will increase readiness as we diagnose faster with better accuracy. Bringing this type of training to our Soldiers will help us cut contractor cost and build confidence in their abilities.”

  • The 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) would like to invite you to a Redeployment Ceremony for the Soldiers of the 418th Transportation Company, 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion scheduled for 10:00 a.m. on Sunday, Dec. 22 at the West Fort Hood Physical Fitness Center.

    Gate time for media members interested in attending the ceremony will be Sunday, Dec. 22 at 8:30 a.m. at the Marvin Leath Visitor Center.

    All interested media members please RSVP with Sgt. 1st Class Chris Bridson at chris.a.bridson.mil@mail.mil <mailto:chris.a.bridson.mil@mail.mil> or 443-924-0404 no later than Saturday, Dec. 21 at 5:00 p.m.

    Please arrive at the gate promptly so we have adequate time to proceed to the ceremony.

  • Volunteer Soldiers from the 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), receive a mission brief from Ann Farris, Co-director of the Killeen Food Care Center, Nov. 22, 2013, at the Killeen Special Events Center. The Wrangler Soldiers joined forces with other Fort Hood units, middle school students, local volunteers, and the Killeen Food Care Center for the 24th annual Food for Families drive. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Chris Bridson, 4th Sust. Bde. PAO, 13th ESC.)  One of the six M-1078, Light Medium Tactical Vehicles (LMTV) used by the 96th Transportation Company, 49th Transportation Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), to collect non-perishable food donations, arrives at the Harker Heights HEB as it conducts one of its many trips Nov. 22, 2013. The Wrangler Soldiers joined forces with other Fort Hood units, middle school students, local volunteers, and the Killeen Food Care Center for the 24th annual Food for Families drive. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Chris Bridson, 4th Sust. Bde. PAO.) Spc. Phoebe Lyn Tagle-Moorer, a native of Dededo, Guam, assigned to the 565th Quartermaster Company, 49th Transportation Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), uses a forklift truck to download a pallet of canned goods from the back of an M-1078, Light Medium Tactical Vehicles (LMTV) used to collect food donations at the Killeen Special Events Center, Nov. 22, 2013. Wrangler Soldiers joined forces with other Fort Hood units, middle school students, local volunteers, and the Killeen Food Care Center for the 24th annual Food for Families drive.  (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Chris Bridson, 4th Sust. Bde. PAO, 13th ESC.)

     

     

    By Sgt. 1st Class Chris Bridson

    4th Sust. Bde. Public Affairs

    FORT HOOD, TexasWrangler Soldiers from the 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), joined forces with other Fort Hood units, middle school students, local volunteers, and the Killeen Food Care Center for the 24th annual Food for Families drive at the Special Events Center, Killeen, Nov. 22, 2013.

                Killeen Food Care Center co-director Gerald Farris said that they hoped to collect approximately 125,000 pounds of non-perishable food items this year to exceed last year’s total.

                “The first couple of years we did this we collected about 70,000 pounds,” said Farris. “This year our goal is 125,000 pounds. We went over 100,000 pounds last year but the weather is not helping us much this year.”

                  With temperatures dipping down close to freezing, Farris said that they would not let that deter them from doing everything possible to reach their goal and knew that with the help of the Wrangler Soldiers anything was possible.

                “It is an extra blessing to have the Soldiers out here helping,” he said. “We have some groups here that brought some equipment with them from Fort Hood. They have trucks from the 4th Sustainment (Brigade) here helping collect the food.”

                The main goal of the food drive is to collect as many non-perishable food items as possible to restock the five local area food pantries ready for the upcoming holiday season. The food pantries help out the less fortunate during the busy holiday season by distributing these items, items that Farris says are getting harder to come by because the local stores and community are feeling the economic crunch, too.

                As the day went on, Soldiers from the 4th Sustainment Brigade drove along five different pre-planned routes collecting food from six local schools and stores such as HEB, Walmart, Sam’s Club, and IGA Foodliner.

                “Today we have been hauling pallets of food and boxes of food from different stores in Harker Heights,” said Sgt. Jacob Krpan, a native of Wilton, Calif., assigned to the 96th Transportation Company, 49th Transportation Battalion. “This food is for the shelters around here to help out in the Killeen area,” he added.

                Krpan said that it’s always a good thing for Soldiers to help out the local community, and although it’s his first time volunteering in Texas, he has volunteered before in California.

                Spc. Damarcus Williams, a native of Clayton, N.C. volunteered to drive one of the six M-1078, Light Medium Tactical Vehicles (LMTV) used by the 96th Trans Co. to collect all the donations.

                “It feels good to help people that need it in the community,” said Williams. “In high school I was in the Community Service Club, so around Thanksgiving we would go and help out at the soup kitchens handing out food. This is a little different, because you’re not actually handing out the food, but I’m still collecting it and making a difference,” he added.

                Despite the plummeting temperatures, Williams and the rest of the volunteers from the Wrangler Brigade continued to drive-on well into the early evening, collecting the generous donations from the local communities, all wanting to make a difference in someone’s life this holiday season. 

  • Cpl. James Schultz, a native of Chicago, from the 154th Transportation Company, 49th Transportation Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), explains the route to Rising Star, Texas during an early morning convoy brief, Nov. 20, 2013 at the battalion motorpool. Schultz was the convoy commander for this 300 mile round trip as part of Operation Rising Star, a driver’s training exercise designed to certify Wrangler Soldiers on the M-1078, or Palletized Loading System (PLS). (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Chris Bridson, 4th Sust. Bde. PAO, 13th ESC.) Spc. Esmeralda Ramirez, a native of Kerrville, Texas and a Motor Transport Operator with the 154th Transportation Company, 49th Transportation Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), conducts a radio check to ensure that she can communicate with the rest of the convoy at the battalion motorpool Nov. 20, 2013. Ramirez was the driver for the Bobtail recovery vehicle during Operation Rising Star, a driver’s training exercise designed to certify Wrangler Soldiers on the M-1078 Palletized Loading System (PLS). (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Chris Bridson, 4th Sust. Bde. PAO.) Soldiers from the 154th Transportation Company, 49th Transportation Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), leave the motorpool for a convoy to Rising Star, Texas Nov. 20, 2013. The Wrangler Soldiers were participating in Operation Rising Star, a driver’s training exercise designed to certify Wrangler Soldiers on the M-1078 Palletized Loading System (PLS). (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Chris Bridson, 4th Sust. Bde. PAO, 13th ESC.)

     

    By Sgt. 1st Class Chris Bridson

    4th Sust. Bde. Public Affairs

     FORT HOOD, TexasIn the early hours of Nov. 20, 2013, Soldiers from the 154th Transportation Company, 49th Transportation Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade waited in the company motorpool for their convoy brief before setting off on a 300 mile round trip along Central Texas roads to earn their driver’s license and qualify on the M-1075, or Palletized Loading System (PLS).

                “Operation Rising Star is designed to get your trucks out on the road, get your new guys some experience, and get them licensed up,” said Staff Sgt. Ralph C. Williams Jr., the Truck Master for the 154th TC, and a native of Beaumont, Texas.

                For the past couple of weeks, the men and women of the 154th TC were put through their paces at the Drivers Training Academy (DTA) learning how to competently handle various tactical vehicles before moving on to the PLS training.

                “It’s (DTA) a 2-week course. They learn the Texas laws and they get familiar with the pieces of equipment that they are going to be going to. They also get licensed on the 1078 LMTV (Light Mobility Tactical Vehicle) and the Humvee coming straight out of DTA they get those licenses there,” added Williams.

                Over the past few days, Williams and his Senior Driving Instructors (SDI) have made the trip to Rising Star multiple times and as a result they decided that this convoy and convoy brief will be run by the junior Noncommissioned Officers such as Cpl. James Schultz, a native of Chicago, and the convoy commander for this trip to Rising Star.

                “We will be traveling in the dark for the majority of the route, so make sure you keep an eye out for animals that will be a hazard on the route,” said Schultz, as he conducted his convoy brief. “We encountered 3 black cows in the middle of the road the other night,” he added.

                As soon as the convoy brief was over, the Soldiers headed out to their vehicles and conducted their final checks before heading out on the open road. The drivers and truck commanders check safety equipment, lights and hoses, and ensure that the trailers are connected properly before giving the convoy commander the “thumbs up.”

                At the very back of the convoy is the Bobtail truck, or recovery vehicle, normally manned by experienced drivers and designated to move forward if needed to tow any disabled vehicle back to the motorpool.

                “I will be in the Bobtail and we will be making sure that if anyone breaks down we can recover the vehicle and pick up the Soldiers,” said Spc. Esmeralda Ramirez, a native of Kerrville, Texas and a Motor Transport Operator with the 154th TC. “I have been driving vehicles in the Army for three years now.”

                Ramirez recently transferred to the 154th TC from the 96th TC where she gained vital experience during a tour in Afghanistan and hopes that she can pass this experience on to the new Soldiers in her current unit.

                With no major problems throughout the month’s training and ten newly licensed PLS drivers contributing to the success of Operation Rising Star, the men and women of the 154th Transportation Company are confident and ready to take on any task that the 4th Sustainment Brigade may be asked to carry out in defense of this great nation.  

  • FORT HOOD, Texas – The Defense Military Pay Office will modify operating hours in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday, Nov. 27 - 29.

     

    Customer Service Sections

     

    *           Wednesday, Nov. 27

     

    All Fort Hood DMPO locations will be open but operate with reduced personnel. Expect a longer than usual wait to see a Customer Service Specialist.  

     

     

    *          Thursday, Nov. 28 - Thanksgiving Day

     

    All DMPO Locations will be closed.  This affects the main DMPO at Building 2805, The In/Out Processing Center at the Copeland Center, as well as MOB/DEMOB operations at the SRP Site in Building 18000.

     

     

    *          Friday, Nov. 29

     

    All DMPO Locations will be closed due to Training Holiday.

     

     

    *          Friday, Dec. 13

     

    All Fort Hood DMPO locations will be open but operate with reduced personnel. Expect a longer than usual wait to see a Customer Service Specialist.  

     

     

    *           Monday, 23 Dec. 13 – Friday, 3 Jan. 14

     

    All Fort Hood DMPO Locations will close at 12:00 p.m. (noon) in accordance with III Corps OPERATION ORDER PW 13-10-0873 (HOLIDAY SCHEDULE 2013).  Customers may experience longer the usual wait times to see a Customer Service Specialist.  All DMPO Locations will be closed 24 and 31 December for Training Holidays.

     

     

    For more information contact:

    Fort Hood Defense Military Pay Office

    (254) 287-8819

    Lt. Col. Ralph M. Crum

    Fort Hood, TX 76544

    ralph.m.crum.mil@mail.mil

  • Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the commanding general of 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), answers questions from members of the Leadership Temple class at the motorpool for 49th Movement Control Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, during a tour of Fort Hood Nov. 12. LeMasters answered questions ranging from budgetary and Army downsizing concerns to "What can we do to help the Soldiers?"  Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO Steve Draper, the curator of the 1st Cavalry Division Museum, provides a tour of the museum to a group of Temple Chamber of Commerce members with the Leadership Temple program during a tour of Fort Hood Nov. 12.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO Col. Matt G. Melvin, the chief of operations for 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), provides an overview briefing of the 13th SC(E) to a group of business and community leaders from the city of Temple during a visit to Fort Hood Nov. 12. The group was part of the Chamber of Commerce's Leadership Temple class. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO
    H.B. Macey, an account executive with Perry Office Plus in Temple and a class leader with the Temple Chamber of Commerce's Leadership Temple class, tests his marksmanship at the Fort Hood Electronic Skills Trainer during a visit to Fort Hood Nov. 12. The tour was part of the Leadership Temple program designed for Temple Chamber of Commerce members to gain an in-depth understanding of their community and learn to become future community leaders. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO Sgt. Jason Voelker, a K-9 handler with the 226th Military Working Dog Detachment, 178th Military Police Detachment, 89th Military Police Brigade, discusses the working capabilities of his and his Specialized Search Dog, Grek, with members of Temple Chamber of Commerce's Leadership Temple program during a tour of Fort Hood Nov. 12.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO A group of 14 Temple Chamber of Commerce members with the Leadership Temple class gather for a group photo next to a Mine-Resistant, Ambush-Protected Vehicle at the 1st Cavalry Division Museum Nov. 12 during a tour of Fort Hood. The MRAP, belonging to the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cav. Div., was the last vehicle to leave Iraq following the conclusion of Operation New Dawn.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO
    By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson
    13th SC(E) PAO

    Soldiers from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) hosted a group of business and community leaders from the city of Temple for a tour of Fort Hood Nov 12.

    The group of 14 community leaders from the Leadership Temple class, began their day at the 13th SC(E) headquarters building for an informational briefing of the sustainment and support operations on Fort Hood.

    Following that, the tour proceeded to test their marksmanship skills at the Electronic Skills Trainer before lunch at the Freeman Cafe Dining Facility.

    After lunch the class received a tour and demonstration of the 226th Military Working Dog Detachment, 178th Military Police Detachment, 89th Military Police Brigade's, as well as a guided tour of the 1st Cavalry Division Museum.

    The day concluded with a question and answer session with Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the commanding general of 13th SC(E), in the motorpool of 49th Movement Control Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade.

    Leadership Temple is a program designed for Temple Chamber of Commerce members to obtain an in-depth knowledge about their community while also learning to become future leaders within the City of Temple.

    “Fort Hood is a major component and partner for our community,” said H.B. Macey, an account executive at Perry Office Plus in Temple and the lead organizer of the tour for the class. “The city of Temple is fortunate to have a neighboring Army base with so many Soldiers and their Families living and working within our town.”

    The main purpose of the class visiting Fort Hood was to get a personal knowledge of what the Soldiers of Fort Hood experience day-to-day.

    “It's very easy to read in the newspaper or listen to the media about what is happening on Fort Hood but nothing compares to seeing the organization and structure first hand,” said Macey. “The class really enjoyed getting to speak with individual Soldiers from all ranks and hearing what their day to day life is like.”

    The 13th SC(E) has had a long-standing community partnership with the city of Temple, and events like this not only help to increase the knowledge of what is going on at Fort Hood for the upcoming leaders of Temple, but also help to build on the joint venture between the two communities.

    “The relationship with the Temple community has grown strong through the years because of great support of past leaders at Fort Hood,” said LeMasters. “It is our job to continue to foster those interactions with our partners and maintain the positive relationship that has already been established.”

    LeMasters continued by saying that he believes the reason Fort Hood is known as the Great Place is because of the strong community involvement with the Soldiers.

    “The people of Central Texas are the best in the country at supporting our Soldiers. You can sense there is a strong, honest desire of the community to want to be a part of the Fort Hood Soldier’s lives and to support them in any way that they can.”

  • Toys line the shelves of the Fort Hood Santa’s Workshop prior to the ribbon cutting ceremony and symbolic kickoff of the holiday season for the program Nov. 7. Approved families will be given appointments beginning Dec. 4 to shop Santa’s Workshop and have the opportunity to pick toys, games and books that their children would appreciate.  The 1st Cavalry Division Band serenades guests at the kickoff event for the Fort Hood Santa’s Workshop Nov. 7. Last year, more than 1,600 families were supported by the Santa’s Workshop program by providing toys, games and books to more than 3,500 children. Together, Santa Clause and Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the commander of 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), address the attendees at the kickoff event for the Fort Hood Santa’s Workshop Nov. 7. The program began as a 13th Corps Support Command initiative in the 1990s before growing to a post-wide program for Fort Hood’s Soldiers and Families in 1998. Even as the program grew beyond the 13th SC(E), the program still remains a near and dear to the hearts for the Provider Soldiers.  (from left to right) Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the commander of 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), Santa Clause, Lisa West, president of Santa’s Workshop and Command Sgt. Maj. Terry E. Parham, senior enlisted leader of 13th SC(E), cut the ribbon symbolizing the kickoff of the holiday season for the Fort Hood Santa’s Workshop Nov. 7.

      

    By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson

    13th SC(E) PAO

    With the holiday season just around the corner, the senior leadership with 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) helped jumpstart the joyous season during a ribbon cutting ceremony at the Fort Hood Santa’s Workshop Nov. 7.

    Santa’s Workshop is a nonprofit organization that originally began as a 13th Corps Support Command initiative in the 1990’s and, with its popularity, grew to an installation-wide program in 1998, serving Fort Hood Soldiers and their Families.

    Last year, more than 1,600 families were supported – providing toys, games and books to more than 3,500 children. This year, families will be given appointments beginning Dec. 4 to shop Santa’s Workshop and have the opportunity to pick the two toys and book that their children would appreciate. Each family also picks out one board game per family which helps to promote family togetherness.

    Santa’s Workshop is fully operated through volunteers donating their time to run the program’s operations and other outlets’ toy and funding donations.

    “The success of Santa’s Workshop depends on the community; they’re the ones who help us do this program,” said Lisa West, president of Santa’s Workshop. “We’re just the administrators. Without the donations from the community and the Soldiers, we would not be able to do this.”

    The program is open to all Soldiers and families of deployed servicemembers regardless of rank, based on financial hardship and command referral through the individual’s command financial specialists.

    “Many of our Soldiers are experiencing unexpected financial difficulties, or even just making ends meet. Being able to shop here, and get the quality toys for their children, makes a world of difference for these families,” said West. “I helped one lady last year with her shopping and when she was finished she started crying and gave me a great big hug and said, ‘I never thought I could give my children a Christmas this year. Santa’s Workshop has made all the difference.’”

    Although the program has grown larger than the 13th SC(E) footprint, the “Provider” Soldiers still maintain a high level of involvement volunteering with the program leading up to the holiday seasons.

    “I am exceptionally proud of 13th SC(E)’s involvement in this program,” said Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the commanding general for 13th SC(E). “Who wouldn’t want to be associated with an organization whose mission statement reads, ‘Contribute to the advancement and improvement of the quality of life on the installation, and to make toys accessible to needy kids of Fort Hood and our Families’?”

    West echoed LeMasters’ comments while adding, “The support that we’ve received from the 13th SC(E) Soldiers has been fantastic,” she said. “They’ve helped everywhere from assisting with the setup of Santa’s Workshop to helping haul five large pallets worth of toys off a delivery truck – and they’ve always shown up with a smile on their face and an eagerness to assist.”

    LeMasters added a call to the leaders of Fort Hood, “If you’ve got a Soldier out there, and you know they’ve got needs, ask them. There’s still ways to get them into this so they can get in and get their kids something. That’s what this thing is all about.”

    The application deadline for Families was Oct. 28; however, applications may still be accepted after the deadline on a case by case basis. Soldiers may contact their command financial specialists or www.swsforthood.com for additional information.


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  • Col. Matt G. Melvin, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) operations officer in charge, speaks to a crowd of military veterans during a Veteran’s Day program at the William R. Courtney Veterans Home in Temple, Texas, Nov. 11. During his speech, Melvin spoke of the importance for Soldiers past and present to share their stories with one another and get to know the history outside of a book. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO 1st Lt. Chris Czupryna, assistant operations officer with 4th Special Troops Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), discusses modern Army tactical gear with David Arnold, an Air Force veteran who served in the Korean War, and his daughter, Sara Sue, following a Veteran’s Day program at the William R. Courtney Texas State Veterans Home in Temple, Texas, Nov. 11. Soldiers from the 4th Sust. Bde. and 13th SC(E) had the opportunity to visit with the veterans and share stories about the difference in the military gear from conflicts past and present.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th SC(E) PAO Veterans living in William R. Courtney Texas State Veterans Home in Temple, Texas make their way through the receiving line composed of senior leaders and their spouses of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) during the home's Veterans Day Ball on Nov. 11. Soldiers from the 13th SC(E) and 4th Sustainment Brigade spent the morning assisting the center to celebrate Veterans Day. Photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO A young officer chats with residents at the William R. Courtney Texas State Veterans Home in Temple, Texas during a Veterans Day Ball on Nov. 11. Several Soldiers spent the morning assisting the center to commemorate Veterans Day with a ceremony, and mixed and mingled with the residents during the evening formal event, which followed the usual protocol of having a receiving line, posting the colors, invocation, guest speaker, retiring the colors and even some music allowing the more mobile residents to dance once the dance floor opened. Photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO

     

    Story by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO

    Soldiers from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) and 4th Sustainment Brigade spent Veterans Day with the veterans living at the William R. Courtney Texas State Veterans Home in Temple, Texas.

    During the morning, the Soldiers assisted with a ceremony commemorating Veterans Day with a color guard, guest speaker and small equipment display; in the evening they participated in a ball.

    Col. Matt G. Melvin, the chief of operations from the 13th SC(E) was the guest speaker of the morning ceremony. He thanked the veterans for their service and charged them to pass on their experiences to others.

    “Today for Veteran’s Day, I came out and gave a speech where I tried to recognize all the American veterans and the importance of their story,” said Melvin.  “It’s about asking them to share those stories and experiences with today’s Soldiers and youth. We, veterans like to be humble and don’t like to tell our stories and I was prodding them to share them.”

    “Their history paved the way for guys like me,” Melvin continued. “I don’t want to read about them in history books.” He said it means the world to him to visit with veterans, listen to them and see their emotions reflect in their eyes. “It’s why I serve today, because of people like them.”

    Wilson R. Easter, World War II veteran with the 3rd Infantry Division, and resident of the home, was able to browse modern Army equipment, getting a close-up look at an Interceptor Body Armor and a ballistic Kevlar helmet. “I wish we had some of this gear 70 years ago when I was in. We didn’t have anything near as high quality as this,” Easter said.

    “It means a lot to me that these young Soldiers come out here,” he continued. “It means a lot to know that they share our stories and experiences together.”

    The Soldiers participating in the event made sure that they spent time with all veterans at the home, regardless of which part of the facility they were housed in. Blue Army Service Uniforms spotted the dining area and activity areas, sharing stories, dinner, cupcakes and smiles with the residents of the home.

    “I think these veterans have a lot of wisdom – a lot of experience. To be able to listen and learn from them, regardless if they were a Soldier in World War II or a general in Vietnam, they have a lot of information and experiences that we can all learn from,” said Melvin.

  • Soldiers from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) and policemen from the Belton Police Department raise the national colors on an 80-foor flagpole during the Patriot Plaza rededication ceremony 8 Nov. in Belton. On Veterans Day in 2011, the 13th SC(E) color guard assisted with raising the old flag here for the first time. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO Soldiers from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) and policemen from the Belton Police Department raise the national colors on an 80-foor flagpole during the Patriot Plaza rededication ceremony 8 Nov. in Belton. On Veterans Day, 2011, Brig. Gen. Terrence J. Hildner, the 13th SC(E) former commander spoke during the dedication ceremony weeks before deploying to Afghanistan with a selected group of his staff. Hildner passed away in Afghanistan unexpectedly in early 2012. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO Participants of the Patriot Plaza rededication ceremony render proper honors as the national anthem is played on 8 Nov. in Belton, near the intersection of IH35 and Central Avenue. Patriot Plaza is part of the Central Avenue Gateway Street Project, which connects IH 35 with downtown Belton. The command team and color guard of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) and the 4th Sustainment Brigade commander participated in the event, showing support for the unit's partner city, Belton. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO Members of the Belton Police Department and Soldiers from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) march across Central Avenue to carry a giant U.S. flag and raise it during the Patriot Plaza rededication ceremony Nov. 8. The 13th SC(E) and one of it's subordinate units, the 4th Sustainment Brigade are partnered with Belton and conduct several events together each year. On Veterans Day 2011, it was the color guard of the 13th SC(E) who assisted in raising the colors on the 80-foot flagpole of Patriot Plaza for the first time. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO Belton leaders, and leaders from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) stand during the Patriot Plaza rededication ceremony in Belton on 8 Nov. 13th SC(E) commander, Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters and Belton Mayor Jim Covington share a friendly glance on the right side of the formation. Belton and the 13th units have a long-standing relationship. Soldiers participated in various projects in Belton, and they often interact with schools in the Belton Independent School District, the University of Mary Hardin Baylor and the Christian Youth Center.
    Soldiers from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) and policemen from the Belton Police Department raise the national colors on an 80-foor flagpole during the Patriot Plaza rededication ceremony 8 Nov. in Belton. 13th SC(E), 4th Sustainment Brigade and Belton have been partners for a long time, mutually supporting each other during various events and celebrations, and Soldiers visiting several Belton schools through the Adopt-A-School program. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO Policemen from the Belton Police Department and Soldiers from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) raise a giant U.S. flag during the Patriot Plaza rededication ceremony 8 Nov. in Belton. The unit and the city have a long-standing partnership, so much so, that the unit carried the Belton city flag with them to a deployment in Afghanistan. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, Jr., the commander of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) renders a salute as he receives a giant U.S. flag from members of the Belton Chamber of Commerce 8 Nov. during the Patriot Plaza rededication ceremony.  His unit and the City of Belton have been partners and friends for decades. The color guard of the 13th SC)E) assisted raising this flag on Veterans Day 2011, when Patriot Plaza was originally dedicated. The unit will display this valued flag in their headquarters building. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, the commander of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) gives a speech during the Patriot Plaza rededication ceremony in Belton 8 Nov. His unit and the City of Belton have been partnered for decades. After the ceremony, as a surprise, members of the Belton Chamber of Commerce gifted the giant U.S. flag that was first flown at Patriot Plaza to the command team of the 13th SC(E). U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters, the commander of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) gives a speech during the Patriot Plaza rededication ceremony in Belton 8 Nov. His unit and the City of Belton have been partnered for decades. Several veterans attended the event, representing decades of military generations. The commander commended Belton for taking such great care of service members and veterans. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO

    Story by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO 

    Soldiers and the command team from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) participated in the Patriot Plaza rededication ceremony on Nov. 8 in Belton, and were in for a wonderful surprise upon completion of the event.

    Members of the Belton Area Chamber of Commerce presented the a giant flag, that has flown on the 80-foot flag pole in the center of the plaza for the past two years, since the original dedication on Nov. 9, 2011.

    At the beginning of the ceremony, the Soldiers assisted the members of the Belton Police Department to raise the new flag, replacing the one that was gifted.

    As the Mayor of the City of Belton, Jim Covington and the Belton Chamber Military Relations Chairman, Jay Taggart explained, the story of Patriot Plaza goes back more than a decade. Belton really wanted to honor veterans, given the city’s close relationship to Fort Hood, so as part of their Central Avenue Street Project, they have built the Patriot Way Brick Walk and Patriot Plaza.

    The latter was dedicated during Veterans Day weekend in 2011, by the 13th SC(E)’s that time commander, the late Brig. Gen. Terrence J. Hildner, said Covington. In that ceremony, it was the color guard of the 13th SC(E), who raised the giant U.S. flag.

    Dedicating the plaza to veterans came natural for a city that has such close ties with service members at Fort Hood. “It is our way as a community to say that we know of your service, we thank you for your service, recognizing what you have done for both you and your family, and have given us the freedoms that we enjoy today as the greatest country in the world,” said Taggart. 

    The SC(E) commander  commended Belton for being a wonderful partner city to his unit. “I am extremely proud of the great relationship we have with the City of Belton. It is more than just signs on schools, it is friendships and it is personal involvement and it is a relationship that we have established since this command has been at Fort Hood,” LeMasters said.

    The commander also thanked Belton for showing such great appreciation for members of the military: “You could have chosen to look at the college, the fire department, the police department or others, but we greatly appreciate the fact that you looked at the military, and part of this is here to honor the military.”

    He concluded his remarks by assuring his audience that no matter what hardships will come her way; the Army will keep marching along.  “For those of you who have served, thank you for the legacy you left for us, and thank you for establishing the way ahead for us to follow.”

    The ceremony concluded with the surprise presentation of the giant U.S. flag to the command team of the 13th SC(E), which unit will display in their headquarters building.

  • 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) to conduct “active shooter” exercise

    FORT HOOD, Texas -- The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) will conduct a series of  “active shooter” force protection exercises in their unit footprint in the vicinity of Support Avenue and 62nd and 67th Streets here at various times between 4-9 November, during regular military working hours (06:30 a.m to 5 p.m.).

    The purpose of the exercise is to test members of the unit on what they have learned during past training sessions on how to react in case of an active shooter incident.

    Once again, this will be an exercise only; please don’t be alarmed if you hear about certain buildings being on a brief shut-down. The exercise should not interfere with any Fort Hood traffic. The exact dates and times of the exercises are purposefully not disclosed at this time, so that Soldiers are truly tested on how to react in certain situations.

    The event is not open to the media.

  • Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters Jr., the commander of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) calls on the audience not to be bashful and ask all of their questions about the Global Combat Support System-Army implementation at Fort Hood, during a Rehearsal of Concept Drill at Fort Hood's Mission Command Training Center Oct. 17. Photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO
    Chief Warrant Officer 2 Quantamaria C. Weeks, a supply systems technician with the Support Operations Section of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) responds to a question about Global Combat Support System-Army during a Rehearsal of Concept (ROC) Drill at Fort Hood's Mission Command Training Center Oct. 17. Weeks is one of the Fort Hood subject matter experts on the new system, which is in the process of being implemented Army-wide. Photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO
    Pfc. Shaunja Patrick, a wheeled vehicle mechanic from 509th Brigade Support Company, 504th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade, reads her part of a parts order vignette during a Rehearsal of Concept (ROC) Drill conducted about the Fort Hood Wave 1 Global Support System-Army conversion at the Mission Command Training Center here 17 Oct. Organizers invited system operators from units who have received some training on the new system, illustrating the step by step process of a parts order, for example. Photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO Logisticians listen attentively during an installation-wide Wave 1 Global Combat Support System-Army Conversion Rehearsal of Concept (ROC) Drill at the Fort Hood Mission Command Training Center Oct. 17. The event intended to bridge the training gap between system operators and higher level managers who may not have received the same training but will have to have a working knowledge of the system to be able to manage their units’ budget, supplies or maintenance with the help of GCSS-Army. Photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO

    Story by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO

    Members of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) Support Operations section hosted a Rehearsal of Concept (ROC) Drill on Global Combat Support System-Army procedures with fellow Fort Hoot Logisticians Oct. 17 at the Fort Hood Mission Command Training Center.

    The goal of the ROC Drill was to provide familiarization for the detailed procedures and training requirements of ‘G-Army,’ as personnel already introduced to the system nicknamed it.

    “The purpose of this is to fill a gap that we perceived in our training,” said Col. John McCoy, the support operations officer of the 13th SC(E). “There is a lot of fielding training that goes on at the operator level, and at the supervisor level.  We saw that some of the higher level managers would not get that same level of training, yet they would still be responsible for operations of units when they go through the Wave One conversion.  This ROC Drill provides an overview of the maintenance, finance, SASMO-Sustainment Automation Support Management Office, and supply aspects of Wave One conversion that are going to affect select Fort Hood units. Higher-level managers otherwise may not learn of G-Army conversion challenges until after the conversion happens,” McCoy said.

    The first 13 ROC Drill vignettes walked the over 100 participants through how orders are processed in the new, and soon to be fielded at Fort Hood, GCSS-Army system when an item is on hand or not on hand at the Supply Support Activity (SSA). Organizers also illustrated how the future equivalent of an “026” maintenance report will be generated and read once G-Army has been implemented at Fort Hood.

    The new system once fully implemented across our Army will not only include automated supply orders and maintenance management, but it will also “integrate approximately 40,000 local supply and logistics databases into a single, enterprise-wide authoritative system,” as the GCSS-Army webpage states.

    The new procedures are similar, yet different with G-Army, said Maj. Alicia R. Dease, the Logistics Automation Officer for 13th SC(E), an FA 53 signal officer. “With the old system, you request it, you get the money. With the new system, you get the money, and then you request it,” Dease explained.

    With G-Army comes a new vocabulary also. What you referred to as ‘ORILs’ (Overaged Repairable Items List) in the past, are now simply called ‘Repairables’ in G-Army, said Dease.

    Both McCoy and Dease agreed that having legacy systems and the G-Army system run concurrently will pose challenges.  Lessons learned from Fort Bliss, Texas, where some units are already fully up and running on G-Army, showed that during major field training exercises, operators must be closely connected to funds mangers, otherwise the unit may not have the necessary funds behind the orders they place.  Additional training challenges arise when converted units go to the National Training Center in Calif., for example, they may have to sign for and start using the legacy systems again.  Soon, Soldiers newly graduating from Advanced Individual Training may only know the new system but they may get assigned to a unit still using the legacy systems. 

    According to McCoy, the next big step at Fort Hood is called New Equipment Training (NET). It is designed to be the training for warehouse, finance, and material managers.  During this training, Soldiers are provided specific training on the new G-Army equipment and software. “NET is followed by a ‘brownout period’ where we slow down the systems, we align the financial and supply systems, and then a ‘blackout period’ which is a time when last minute adjustments to codes within the new systems are made.  We aim to go live with G-Army Wave 1 Conversion in mid-November.”

    Personnel interested to learn more about GCSS-Army should consult the website at: http://gcss.army.mil/ .   For Fort Hood installation information, go to https://www.us.army.mil/suite/files/41350594 and search for “Fort Hood Wave 1 GCSS-Army ROC Drill.”

  • The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) is scheduled to host a Memorial Rededication Ceremony and Wreath Laying at Hildner Field at 11 a.m. on Friday, Sept. 27, as part of the unit’s 48th Birthday Week celebration.

    Media is invited to the Memorial Rededication Ceremony with the option of participating in the follow on luncheon and cake cutting.

    Media members interested in covering the ceremony and optional follow on events please RSVP no later than 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26, with Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) Public Affairs, at 254-288-6410 or monika.comeaux.mil@mail.mil. Attending media should be at Marvin Leath Visitor Center’s designated media parking lot at 10:00 a.m. on Sept. 27.

    The 13th SC(E) is celebrating the unit's 48th birthday during the week of  Sept. 23-27.

    Soldiers started off Monday with an esprit de corps run.

    Thursday, interested Soldiers will participate in the Brig. Gen. Terry Hildner Memorial Golf Tournament and the 13th SC(E) Birthday Dinner both hosted by the 13th COSCOM Association.

    On Friday, the unit and the association will also conduct the 13th SC(E) Memorial Rededication Ceremony at Hildner Field, followed by a luncheon and a cake cutting.

    The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) was activated at Ford Hood as the 13th Support Brigade in September 1965. As the nation's involvement in Vietnam was increasing, this brigade was formed and tasked with training technical services units to assume combat service support missions in Southeast Asia.

    The command continued to evolve due to increased missions and changing roles, and, along with similar units, was redesignated as the 13th Support Command (Corps) in 1980, then as the 13th Corps Support Command (COSCOM) in March 1989. As part of Army Transformation, the 13th Sustainment Command (expeditionary) was reflagged in its current configuration on 16 Feb 2006.

    The command’s primary missions are to provide command and control of assigned, attached and operational control (OPCON) units, and to plan for and provide sustainment (supply, maintenance, and field services), distribution, and health service support for full spectrum operations.

    Currently, the 13th SC(E) is Fort Hood's third largest unit with a local strength of over 3,500 Soldiers. The command is comprised of the 4th Sustainment Brigade and the 13th Financial Management Center.

     

     

  • Story by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO

                Over 150 Fort Hood Soldiers had a barbecue lunch as a courtesy of the Temple Chamber of Commerce Sept. 17 at the Frank W. Mayborn Civic and Convention Center in Temple, Texas.

                The chamber’s Military Appreciation Luncheon takes place annually; the event also serves as the kick-off for the chamber’s military toy drive for the holidays.

                “I think you agree with me that we have the greatest military force on Earth, all volunteer,” said Jim Granfor, the chairman of the Temple Chamber of Commerce Military Affairs Committee, in his opening remarks. Granfor complemented all services for their contributions, and made sure that the audience honored veterans and those who currently serve with several rounds of applause.

                There is a longstanding history and cooperation between the city of Temple and Soldiers from the 1st MED Brigade and 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), said Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters Jr., the commander of the 13th SC(E) and the events keynote speaker. “The most important part of this event is to have the opportunity to talk with each other,” said LeMasters, and challenged participants to talk to the Soldiers in the audience and ask them a couple of questions about their background and the Army, if they haven’t already done so. “It’s all about getting to know you and getting to know us.”

                “These Soldiers here today represent not only the Army, but the future of our great nation…our all volunteer Army is an example for other Nations,” LeMasters added.  He then went into talking about budget cuts, the new Defense Strategy Guidance and force restructuring. “Let me assure you, that the senior leaders of our Army are looking at these challenges.” LeMasters expressed his confidence that leaders at high levels will make the best decisions for the future of the forces.

    1st Lt. Sherry Klander, an operations officer from the Texas Army National Guard’s 36th Sustainment Brigade said her unit put out a memorandum to let the Soldiers know about the event. “It was great; it was an awesome experience to see community support.” In her civilian life she is a photographer in Temple, and owns her own business photographing “anything from babies to pets to weddings.” Klander said this was the first time she attended the military appreciation luncheon and thought it would be great to see other community events like a career fair for a meet and greet for Soldiers.

     

    http://www.dvidshub.net/news/113821/soldiers-honored-with-luncheon-temple-chamber

  • Story by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th SC(E) PAO Over 150 Fort Hood Soldiers, amongst them several Providers, had barbecue lunch as a courtesy of the Temple Chamber of Commerce Sept. 17 at the Frank W. Mayborn Civic and Convention Center in Temple, Texas. The chamber’s Military Appreciation Luncheon takes place annually; the event also serves as the kick-off for the chamber’s military toy drive for the holidays. “I think you agree with me that we have the greatest military force on Earth, all volunteer,” said Jim Granfor, the chairman of the Temple Chamber of Commerce Military Affairs Committee, in his opening remarks. Granfor complemented all services for their contributions, and made sure that the audience honored veterans and those who currently serve with several rounds of applause. There is a longstanding history and cooperation between the city of Temple and Soldiers from the 1st MED Brigade and 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), said Brig. Gen. Clark W. LeMasters Jr., the commander of the 13th SC(E) and the events keynote speaker. “The most important part of this event is to have the opportunity to talk with each other,” said LeMasters, and challenged participants to talk to the Soldiers in the audience and ask them a couple of questions about their background and the Army, if they haven’t already done so. “It’s all about getting to know you and getting to know us.” “These Soldiers here today represent not only the Army, but the future of our great nation…our all volunteer Army is an example for other Nations,” LeMasters added. He then went into talking about budget cuts, the new Defense Strategy Guidance and force restructuring. “Let me assure you, that the senior leaders of our Army are looking at these challenges.” LeMasters expressed his confidence that leaders at high levels will make the best decisions for the future of the forces. 1st Lt. Sherry Klander, an operations officer from the Texas Army National Guard’s 36th Sustainment Brigade said her unit put out a memorandum to let the Soldiers know about the event. “It was great; it was an awesome experience to see community support.” In her civilian life she is a photographer in Temple, and owns her own business photographing “anything from babies to pets to weddings.” Klander said this was the first time she attended the military appreciation luncheon and thought it would be great to see other community events like a career fair or a meet and greet for Soldiers. For high resolution photos of the event please visit: http://www.dvidshub.net/news/113821/soldiers-honored-with-luncheon-temple-chamber
  • Cadet Crystal Christian, a human geography student with the United States Military Academy at West Point, completes paperwork at the Cow House Range here July 11. Christian was sponsored by 2nd Lt. Ronnie Madayag, with the 154th Transportation Company, 49th Movement Control Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) during her active duty internship learning the ropes of the transportation environment.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO Cadet Crystal Christian (right), a human geography student with the United States Military Academy at West Point, receives a weapon familiarization briefing on the M249 machine gun from Sgt. Brian Britton, a range safety noncommissioned officer from 297th Transportation Company, 49th Movement Control Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), at the Cow House Range July 11. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO Cadet Crystal Christian (left), a human geography student with the United States Military Academy at West Point, receives instruction from Sgt. Brian Britton, a range safety noncommissioned officer from 297th Transportation Company, 49th Movement Control Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), at an M249 machine gun range at the Cow House Range July 11. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO Cadet Crystal Christian, a human geography student with the United States Military Academy at West Point, fires an M249 machine gun at a range with Soldiers from 297th Transportation Company, 49th Movement Control Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), at the Cow House Range July 11. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO

    By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO

    As part of the United States Military Academy’s academic individual advancement development program, the 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), hosted West Point Cadets for a preview of the active duty military experience prior to their senior school year at the Academy June 2 through July 13.

    The Wranglers sponsored two groups of four West Point Cadets who took the opportunity to learn the sustainment and support operations of the Wrangler Brigade before commissioning into the Army.

    Each group spent three weeks living the Soldier life and shadowing an active duty officer.

    Cadet Crystal Christian, a human geography student at West Point, was sponsored by 2nd Lt. Ronnie Madayag, a platoon leader with the 154th Transportation Company, 49th Movement Control Battalion, 4th Sust. Bde., during her active duty internship.

    “She did a great job,” said Madayag. “She was very receptive of what was going on and contributed wherever there was an opportunity.”

    Christian was given the chance to shadow 1st Lt. Jonathan Watson, a material handling equipment platoon leader with 297th Transportation Company, 49th MCB, as his unit conducted an M249 machine gun range at Cow House Range July 11.

    What may seem as usually a routine training event for many units, provided Christian with her most valuable lesson during her visit; flexibility.

    “We had a few hiccups attempting to open the range,” she said, “but we were able to make adjustments and conduct the training without additional issues. It taught me that no matter how solid the planning and preparation is, unexpected things will still happen and it’s important to be flexible and ready to make adjustments and move out.”

    Overall, Christian said she experienced a lot during her time with 154th Trans. Co. and looked forward to graduating and earning her commission.

    “It was a great opportunity to learn from the Soldiers and officers while I was here,” said Christian. “I was also able to take the lessons I’ve learned in school and apply those to the real life situations here, and will also take what I’ve learned here and apply that to my senior year and hopefully make me a better officer when I commission next year.”

    Madayag said that he hopes she remembers her time spent interacting with the Soldiers. “The Soldiers are the most important asset for any officer. As she moves forward and is commissioned as a second lieutenant, it’s important to remember the number one goal of any officer is to take care of your Soldiers. If not for the Soldiers, we could not accomplish any mission.”

  • Chaplain (Maj.) John Carey, the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) deputy chaplain, sings “America the Beautiful” during a prayer breakfast service sponsored by the 13th ESC at the Freeman Café dining facility here July 3.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO Retired chaplain (Lt. Col.) Harlon Triplett speaks to Soldiers during a prayer breakfast service sponsored by the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) at the Freeman Café dining facility here July 3. Triplett discussed with the Soldiers about the importance of why Soldiers need God. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO Retired chaplain (Lt. Col.) Harlon Triplett speaks to Soldiers during a prayer breakfast service sponsored by the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) at the Freeman Café dining facility here July 3. Triplett talked about Soldiers being his heroes and said he always enjoys opportunities to return back to talk to Soldiers.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO

    By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO

    Soldiers from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) paused from their normal routines to sit down for a spiritually refreshing prayer breakfast at the Freeman Café dining facility here July 3.

    The guest speaker for the breakfast was retired chaplain (Lt. Col.) Harlon Triplett who spoke to the Soldiers about the importance of why Soldiers need God.

    Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Brian Crane, the 13th ESC chaplain, organized the event for the Soldiers wanting to focus on strengthening the unit’s spiritual fitness.

    “The goal is to focus on the spiritual aspects of our Soldiers,” said Crane. “We always focus on the physical, emotional and mental health of the force; today was an opportunity to talk about the spiritual. To build a healthy body, we must take in healthy food and work out with physical training. To build spiritual fitness, we must take in spiritual messages.”

    Triplett referenced several anecdotes during his speech, including referencing life to a game of football.

    “If you were to talk to someone in their 20s, 30s or 40s, to compare their life to a football game, and ask, ‘what quarter are you in?’ most would say the 2nd or 3rd quarter. If you ask a Soldier that same question, they might not know the answer,” said Triplett. “Soldiers are called upon to deploy into harm’s way and to risk their life in defense of the country. Soldiers may not always know when the final buzzer is going to sound and thus need to be prepared if the game ends earlier than planned for.”

    Triplett also talked about the Soldiers being his heroes and said he always enjoys opportunities to return back to talk to the Soldiers. “They are the reason I served for 22 years and the reason I always enjoy returning back to talk to the Soldiers.”

  • Twenty five Soldiers from the 15th Financial Management Company, 4th Special Troops Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), are scheduled to deploy to Afghanistan following a deployment ceremony scheduled for midnight on Wednesday, July 10 at Abrams Physical Fitness Center.

    Gate time for media members interested in attending the ceremony will be Wednesday, July 10 at 10:15 pm at the Marvin Leath Visitor Center.

    Interested media members please RSVP with Sgt. 1st Class Chris Bridson at chris.a.bridson.mil@mail.mil or 254-553-6869 no later than 5 p.m. on Tuesday, July 9.

  • Runners tread water at the start of an annual mud run sponsored by the 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), at Fort Hood’s all-terrain vehicle track July 3. Soldiers ran the three-mile off-road route featuring several mud pits, water crossings, low crawl obstacles and sand bag carries. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO Lt. Col. Keith McVeigh, commander of the 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), runs past the first obstacle in the annual mud run sponsored by 553rd CSSB at Fort Hood’s all-terrain vehicle track July 3. McVeigh said this event was an excellent opportunity for his Soldiers to take a break from the normal grind of Soldiering. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO Sgt. Serpio Anthony, the command group driver for the 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), races through a water crossing during the annual mud run sponsored by 553rd CSSB at Fort Hood’s all-terrain vehicle track July 3. Anthony completed the course with a time of 39 minutes. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO Runners tread water through a water crossing during the annual mud run sponsored by the 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), at Fort Hood’s all-terrain vehicle track July 3. Soldiers ran the three-mile off-road route featuring several mud pits, water crossings, low crawl obstacles and sand bag carries. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO Soldiers from the winning team from 62nd Quartermaster Company, 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), celebrate with the trophy after completing the annual mud run sponsored by 553rd CSSB at Fort Hood’s all-terrain vehicle track July 3 with a group time of 32 minutes, 50 seconds. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO

    By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO

    Soldiers, Family members and community partners with the 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), participated in the battalion’s annual mud run and obstacle course at Fort Hood’s all-terrain vehicle track July 3.

    Soldiers ran the three-mile off-road route featuring several mud pits, water crossings, low crawl obstacles and sand bag carries.

    The quickest individual was Davis Jefferies, 18, stepson to Sgt. Dan Graves with the Killeen Army Recruiting Station, with a time of 26 minutes, 10 seconds, and the fastest team time for the day belonged to the 62nd Quartermaster Company, 553rd CSSB, with a time of 32:50.

    “We motivated each other,” said Sgt. Garcia Mebrahte, a squad leader and runner with the winning team from 62nd QM Co. “It was a challenge, but we all had each other’s backs. We had a lot of different experience between us, but the most important thing was we stuck together and finished together as a team.”

    Lt. Col. Keith McVeigh, commander of the 553rd CSSB, said this event was an excellent opportunity for his Soldiers to take a break from the normal grind of Soldiering.

    “I’ve participated in similar events in the civilian sector,” said McVeigh. “I thought it would be a great event not only for our Soldiers to get away from the daily grind of supporting Fort Hood, but also to build esprit de corps, bond together and do what I call a Gunslinger gut check – a challenge to the Soldiers to see if they could push themselves to complete this challenge, both physically and mentally.”

    “It’s been said before, ‘Fort Hood could not get out of bed in the morning without the services and support that the 13th ESC, 4th Sust. Bde., and subordinate battalions do for this installation,’” continued McVeigh. “It is important to step away from that very important mission and allow the Soldiers the opportunity to get out of that environment and get to know each other in a different manner to help build the team as a unit.”

    Overall, the Soldiers said they enjoyed the event and the challenges inherent in the race.

    “It was a lot of fun, a great experience and I would do it again,” said Sgt. Serpio Anthony, the command group driver for 553rd CSSB.

  • 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion Mud Run 

    FORT HOOD, Texas – The 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) would like to invite members of the media to cover a mud run July 3 starting at 9:00 a.m.

    Participants will have the choice between completing a one-mile and a three-mile track. Tracks are on rough terrain, with various obstacles incorporated throughout the course. The unit anticipates approximately 500 Soldiers and some brave family members to participate in the event.

    Media desiring to cover the event should register with Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) PAO by 12:00 Noon July 2 by email at monika.comeaux.mil@mail.mil or 254-288-7342. Unfortunately, we cannot accommodate satellite trucks for this event. A Public Affairs representative will meet the media at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center south side parking lot at 8:00 a.m. July 3, to escort them on post.

  • 48th Chemical Brigade change of command ceremony

     

    FORT HOOD, Texas – The 48th Chemical Brigade will hold a Change of Command and Change of Responsibility Ceremony in honor of the outgoing command team, Col. Maria T. Zumwalt and Command Sgt. Maj.  Kenneth M. Graham and the incoming command team, Col. Sven C. Erichsen and Command Sgt. Maj. Kendall I. Owens II at 9 a.m. July 2 on the Division West Parade Field here.

    The Change of Command Ceremony is rooted in military history dating back to the 18th century during the reign of King Frederick the Great of Prussia.  During this time, organizational flags were developed with colored arrangements and symbols unique to each particular unit.  To this flag, as well as the commander, Soldiers of the unit would dedicate their loyalty and trust. 

    When a Change of Command was to take place, the outgoing Commander would pass the flag to the incoming Commander.  This gesture was accomplished in front of the unit so that all could see and witness their new Commander assuming their dutiful position. This symbolic tradition has survived throughout military history and will be performed during the Change of Command Ceremony this morning.

    Media desiring to cover the event should register with Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) PAO by noon July 1 by email at monika.comeaux.mil@mail.mil or 254-288-7342. Unfortunately, we cannot accommodate satellite trucks for this event. A Public Affairs representative will meet the media at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center south side parking lot at 8:00 a.m. July 2, to escort them on post.

     

     

     

  • The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) would like to invite  members of the media for the redeployment ceremony of 21 Soldiers from the 502nd Human Resources Company, 4th Special Troops Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, on Thursday, June 20, at approximately noon.

    The Soldiers will be returning from a 9-month deployment to Afghanistan.

    Media interested to cover the event should meet the 13th ESC PAO at the Bernie Beck Gate designated media parking lot at 10:30 a.m.

    If you are interested in covering the event, please contact Capt. Monika Comeaux at monika.comeaux.mil@mail.mil or 254-288-7342 no later than 9 a.m. on June 20.

  • CORRECTION - The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) would like to  invite media personnel to the redeployment ceremony for a group of 23 Soldiers (5th Platoon) from the 502nd Human Resources Company redeploying from KUWAIT on June 19.

    Gate time for the event is 9 p.m., at the Bernie Beck Gate designated media parking lot.

    Media interested in covering the event should contact CPT Monika Comeaux at monika.comeaux.mil@mail.mil or 254-288-7342 no later than noon on June 19.

  • Families, Soldiers bid farewell as 418th Trans. Co. deploys

    Command Sgt. Maj. Jessie C. Bates, the senior noncommissioned officer of the 4th Sustainment Brigade, shares last words of advice with two senior noncommissioned officers of the 418th Transportation Company, 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sust. Bde. following the unit's deployment ceremony on June 10 at the West Fort Hood Physical Fitness Center. The company is deploying to Afghanistan for nine months to line haul bulk and containerized cargo via tactical convoy operations. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th ESC PAO Soldiers from the 418th Transportation Company, 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade stand in formation after casing their guidon during a deployment ceremony at the West Fort Hood Physical Fitness Center June 10. The unit will work in the Western part of Afghanistan, conducting tactical convoy operations. They are expected to return in nine months. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th ESC PAO Lt. Col. Keith McVeigh, the commander of the 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, farewells the 418th Transportation Company as they begin their journey to Afghanistan during a deployment ceremony at the West Fort Hood Physical Fitness Center June 10. The unit with close to 150 Soldiers will conduct tactical convoy operations in Regional Command-West, in Afghanistan. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th ESC PAO Capt. Mark W. Canary, the commander of the 418th Transportation Company, 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Command, stands in front of his formation as they participate in the unit's deployment ceremony at the West Fort Hood Physical Fitness Center June 10. The company will spend nine months in Western Afghanistan, conducting tactical convoy operations. As a sustainment brigade subordinate unit, the company is often deployed as needed to augment other units or formations in the theater of operations. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th ESC PAO Family members wearing patriotic T-shirts arrive to the West Fort Hood Physical Fitness Center to see of their deploying Soldiers in the 418th Transportation Company, 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade on June 10. The Soldiers will be away for nine months, providing transportation support in Western Afghanistan. U.S. Army photo by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th ESC PAO Family members and friends sit on the bleachers at the West Fort Hood Physical Fitness Center to see off the Soldiers of the 418th Transportation Company, 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade on June 10. The unit with close to 150 Soldiers will be providing transportation support in Western Afghanistan. Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th ESC PAO

    Story by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson
    and Capt. Monika Comeaux,
    13th ESC PAO

    FORT HOOD, Texas – Families and Soldiers of the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) and the 4th Sustainment Brigade bid farewell to 136 Soldiers with the 418th Transportation Company, 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sust. Bde., 13th ESC, during a deployment ceremony at the West Fort Hood Physical Fitness Center June 10.

    The 418th Trans. Co. is deploying to Western Afghanistan to conduct line haul of bulk and containerized cargo via tactical convoy operations in order to sustain Coalition Forces operations throughout Regional Command-West.

    “It is with great honor that I stand here to bid farewell to these great Soldiers,” said Lt. Col. Keith McVeigh, commander, 553rd CSSB. “To Capt. (Mark) Canary, 1st Sgt. (Carla) Glover, and the rest of the Road Knights, you have trained hard and you are well prepared to perform the super bowl of your profession. Stand tall, execute mightily, and return home the heroes that you already are.”

    Since initially constituted April 13, 1944, the 418th Trans. Co. has served in combat operations in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Persian Gulf, Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Although the unit has a long history of deployments, many of the Soldiers and Families may be experiencing an unfamiliar event. However, there are always seasoned spouses and friends around to assist and provide advice through the challenging times.

    “Stay focused,” said Dora Middleton, whose spouse, Staff Sgt. Alfred Middleton, a truck master with 418th Trans. Co., is heading out on his fourth deployment.  Middleton strongly believes that the deployed Soldiers lose focus if they are worried about their families, so the person staying home caring for the children has to provide a strong foundation for the family.

    Middleton plans of filling the summer with fun activities such as going to the lake and visiting Sea World in San Antonio. Her and her family had a going away gathering for her husband, and they plan to have a welcome home gathering when he returns.

    She plans on sending cards, care packages, exchanging emails and talking on Skype with her husband while he is away, she said.

    McVeigh wished his Soldiers good luck for the deployment, and concluded the deployment ceremony with looking ahead to the redeployment ceremony nine months down the road.  

     “Everyone here will keep you in their thoughts and prayer as your mission takes you to the unknown, but rest assured, we will be right back here when you return, ready to welcome you home again.”

  • The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) would like to invite media to attend a redeployment ceremony for the 13th Financial Management Company. The unit returns 31 Soldiers after supporting operations in Afghanistan.

    The ceremony, originally scheduled for June 10, is now rescheduled for June 11 at approximately 12:30 p.m. Gate time for this event will be 11:15.

    Please contact Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson at 254-288-7342 to confirm coverage.

  • The 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) and 4th Sustainment Brigade would like to invite media to cover a deployment ceremony for the 418th Transportation Company, 553rd Combat Service Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade. The company will deploy 136 Soldiers in support of operations in Afghanistan. This ceremony will take place at West Fort Hood Gym June 10th at about 8:30 p.m. Gate time will be no later than 7 p.m. Please contact Cpt. Monika Comeaux or Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson at 254-288-7342 to confirm coverage. Visit our home page at http://www.hood.army.mil/13sce/ or our Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/13ESC.
  • <Click here for Hi-Res> <Click here for Hi-Res>

    By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson

    13th ESC PAO

    FORT HOOD, Texas – Soldiers from 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) hosted a group of 17 Boy Scouts and leaders from Troop 838 in Dallas, Texas, for a tour of Fort Hood April 27.

    During their visit, the Boy Scouts experienced the 1st Cavalry Division’s Horse Cavalry Detachment, toured the 1st Cav. Div. Museum, participated in a combatives demonstration and challenged themselves at the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment’s obstacle course.

    Staff Sgt. Roberto Rodriguez, the scout’s guide for the day and a water treatment noncommissioned officer from the 13th ESC, said he designed the itinerary to both entertain and challenge the young scouts.

    “I hope they have a better understanding of what Soldiering is about, and hopefully they see us more as normal people than just what they’ve seen in movies,” said Rodriguez.

    “The first part of the Boy Scout Oath is ‘On my honor, I’ll do my best to do my duty to God and my country’ and I think these trips help further instill patriotism among our scouts,” said Grahan Gardner, a leader for Troop 838 who helped organize the trip for his group. “Time will tell who will decide to go into the military, but this helps instill passion for patriotism and service to our country.”

    Gardner said he and the Boy Scouts enjoyed their visit and look forward to future opportunities to visit Fort Hood. He said the Boy Scouts try to take a camping trip monthly throughout the year, but always try to reserve one weekend per year to visit Fort Hood.

    “This is one of our most popular trips for the troop; we look forward to coming back next year,” said Gardner. “The Army, and Fort Hood, has been great over the years, and it has been rewarding to be able to come back year after year.”

  •  

     

     

    By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson

    13th ESC PAO

    FORT HOOD, Texas – Soldiers from 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) hosted a group of 51 ‘Zoomers’ from Sun City, Texas, for a tour of Fort Hood April 25.

    The Zoomers are an activity group from an active retirement community near Georgetown.

    During their visit, the Zoomers experienced the 1st Cavalry Division’s Horse Cavalry Detachment, fired simulated weapon systems at the Fort Hood Engagement Skills Trainer and toured the 1st Cav. Div. Museum.

    “It was great to take them around Fort Hood for the day and show them some of the activities we’ve got going on around post,” said Sgt. 1st Class Roderick Collins, operations noncommissioned officer for the 13th ESC’s Support Operations section, who was an escort for the day along with Sgt. 1st Class Jason Long, a supply and services NCO also with the SPO section. “It was also great to hear stories as several of them were veterans and had great stories from their time.”

    In addition to the tour guides from 13th ESC, the Zoomers were accompanied by retired Command Sgt. Maj. William Gainey, a former III Corps and Fort Hood command sergeant major and the first person to hold the position of Senior Enlisted Advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff before retiring in 2007.

    “When I was approached by the Zoomers for this trip, I jumped on it,” said Gainey. “When I retired, I purposefully moved back to the Fort Hood area so that I could continue to be close to Soldiers. This is a great opportunity to show some of our neighbors from Sun City just what some of these Soldiers are doing.”

    Gainey said that the trip was not only significant for the group from Sun City to see what the Soldiers do, but it’s also essential that the Soldiers notice the vested interest of partnering communities.

    “It’s important the Soldiers see that the folks from Sun City and other neighbors take interest in what is going on here on Fort Hood,” said Gainey. “Not only are they interested in what’s happening on Fort Hood, they are interested in what the Soldier is doing.”

    “I was really impressed by everything,” said Patrick Henry, a former member of the British Armed Forces who helped organize the trip for his group. “One of the things that really stood out to me was the different technologies that were unthinkable during my time.”

    In the end, Henry said he and the other Zoomers had a fantastic time and look forward to future opportunities to visit Fort Hood. “The Soldiers and everyone have been more than hospitable and have made the occasion memorable. We look forward to returning.”

  • Soldiers from 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) present the colors during the playing of the national anthem at Lakewood Elementary School’s Old Glory Day April 11, 2013. The event is held annually to celebrate the connection amongst the school, the Belton and Fort Hood community. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Jason Kucera) Col. Kevin Vizzarri, commander, 166th Aviation Brigade, and his wife Dominika wave to Lakewood Elementary School students as they marched in a parade around the campus during Old Glory Day April 11, 2013, in Belton, Texas. The Army couple have children who attend Lakewood and said they appreciate the support the school gives military families. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Jason Kucera) Staff Sgt. Joe Contreras and Staff Sgt. Steven Choat, members of the color guard, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) sign their signatures on Old Glory Day T-shirts the students of Lakewood Elementary School in Belton, Texas, were sporting throughout the day’s events. The Soldiers also answered dozens of questions from the young, curious students throughout the visit. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Jason Kucera) 

    Fort Hood, TEXAS- At its annual Old Glory Day event, April 11, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) provided color guard honors at Lakewood Elementary in Belton, Texas.  

    The ESC and Lakewood partnered up through the Adopt-A-School program earlier in 2013.

     “Old Glory Day is a patriotic event to get the kids aware of the military around us,” said Lori Hobbs, a fourth-grade teacher and the chairman for the school’s event. “The kids learn about the different military branches, learning about the flag and what the flag means and learning how to show pride in our country.”

    Not only were a few Provider Soldiers present at the school for the day, local law enforcement visited the school as well as additional special guests. Wounded warriors, participating in the annual Ride 2 Recovery Texas Challenge, a 350 mile cycling journey from the Center of the Intrepid at Fort Sam Houston which winds its way to Fort Worth, Texas, also stopped in on a break to eat lunch and visit with the children.

    School Counselor Leah McGuire, who also manages the adopt-a-unit program for Lakewood, said it had been about two years since they had Soldiers at the school, so they were more than excited for this day to come.

    “I’d really like to see the program get to where it was before. We like having the Soldiers out here so much. Tutoring, volunteering to spend time with the kids individually is great, too,” said McGuire. “Learning what it takes to join the military one day is really good for them to hear. Younger and younger we start teaching them about their future after they graduate high school.”

    At one point in the morning, about 1,000 parents and friends were present to watch their children sing patriotic songs. For the sustainment Soldiers in the color guard, it was a great ceremony and day to be a part of, according to Spc. David Foster, a supply clerk from Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 13th ESC.

    “It’s just really cool to be around the kids, they’re all really good kids and the staff here at the school has been great. This is my first time doing something like this, so I’m just happy to be here,” said Foster.

    Once the Soldiers and supporters riding with the Ride 2 Recovery coasted in on their various design of bikes, things at the school really got busy. With at least 200 active duty troops and veterans riding under their own power, there were also nearly 40 veterans on motorcycles from various regions of the country escorting throughout the entire route.

    The children flocked to the riders, as well as the Soldiers, to plead for autographs on their “Old Glory Day” T-shirts and even their hands and arms. The constant bright smiles and cheery voices kept these combat veterans, of old and young, fully engaged as they could not take a breath before a little one searched for answers to their questions about anything and everything that had to do with the Army.

    “It’s such a good feeling. It just makes you so proud to have the Soldiers that we have and how much we have respect for everybody,” said Hobbs. “I’m just proud to be here, proud to be free and it’s just such a great way for the kids to learn the same.”

    The students then rotated through various classes taught from the Soldiers, Morgan’s Point Resort Police Department and Bell County Sherriff Department. They spent time learning about K-9 operations from the police and the Soldiers discussed the M-16A2 rifle, along with other topics that concerned the young audience.


    For more news from the 13th ESC at Fort Hood, like our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/#!/13ESC

  •  Click here for Hi-Res Image

    Story by Sgt. Stephanie Woodson

     

    FORT HOOD, Texas -- After a nine month deployment to Afghanistan, more than 50 Soldiers assigned to the 49th Movement Control Battalion, 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) returned to greet their loved ones during a welcome home ceremony at West Fort Hood Gym Wednesday.

    The 49th MCB deployed for a nine month mission to Bagram, Afghanistan, to provide movement of cargo and unit equipment around theater.

    The battalion was composed of 19 units at 22 different locations around Afghanistan. 49th MCB served as a higher headquarters for all the movement control teams in theater.

    “The battalion was responsible for about 90,000 missions that covered about 7.5 million miles,” said Lt. Col. Charles Blumenfeld, commander of the 49th MCB, 553rd CSSB, 4th SB. “We’ve got a lot of stuff that we’re moving off the bases, back to Kuwait or back to the U.S.”

    “Seventy percent of what moves inside of Afghanistan, our Soldiers were responsible for,” said Blumenfeld.

    This was Blumenfeld’s fourth deployment but his first to Afghanistan.

    Thinking about the deployment was furthest from their [Soldiers] minds as they embraced their family and friends.

    “I’m very excited that my husband is back,” said Maralinda Perez, waiting for Sgt. Yamil Rodriguez, a transportation coordinator with the 49th, “My stomach is turning flips.”

    “I didn’t tell the children daddy was coming home today,” said Perez. “I wanted it to be a surprise when my husband woke them up for school,” said Perez.

    Communication between the two flowed well during Rodriguez’s deployment.

    “I’m happy Rodriguez is back and safe,” said Sgt. David Quinones, a bridge crew member, assigned to 74th Bridge Company, 62nd Engineer Battalion, 36th Engineer Brigade. “He and his wife have always been there for me when I returned from deployment. I’m just honored I could be here and return the favor.”

    “This deployment was happy and sad at the same time,” said Spc. Uzziel Valencia, a transportation coordinator, assigned to 49th MCB, 4th SB. “I didn’t want to leave my family but it’s something I had to do. Being able to communicate with them every day made a difference.”

    “We came together as a team, stayed focused and used the time to better ourselves,” said Valencia. “Now I’m back preparing myself for airborne school in November and going to see my family.”

    The 39th Movement Control Battalion out of Germany replaced 49th MCB.

    On current plans for the 49th: “Family time and getting Soldiers reintegrated back into garrison and everyday operations back here at Fort Hood,” said Blumenfeld.

  • By Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson

    13th ESC PAO

    Career counselors from the 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) talked with approximately 50 Soldiers from the 13th ESC and the 4th Sustainment Brigade regarding different retention options available during a retention brief at the 13th ESC Soldier and Family Readiness Center March 22.

    Master Sgt. Humberto Flores, the senior career counselor for 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), discusses career options with Soldiers from the 13th ESC and 4th Sustainment Brigade during a retention briefing at the 13th ESC Soldier and Family Readiness Center March 22. The Soldiers who attended the brief are slated to either end term of service or reenlist to remain in the active duty Army. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO)

    The Soldiers who attended the brief are slated to either end term of service or reenlist to remain in the active duty Army.

    Master Sgt. Humberto Flores, the senior career counselor for 13th ESC, led the briefing which featured subjects such as future possibilities for the Soldiers ability to reenlist, reenlistment options available for various occupational specialties, and different benefits available to Soldiers dependant on the options they choose.

    Throughout the briefing, Flores emphasized one subject more than any other; education.

    “The number one thing I want to share, regardless if you’re getting out or staying in, (is that) it’s important to take the necessary steps to prepare yourself for transition to civilian life,” said Flores. “While you’re in, take advantage of the opportunity to receive as much education while you’re still in, both with military training and civilian education.”

    “If you’re staying in, the education and training you pursue will help to build you into a stronger leader and Soldier and prepare you to go on to great things for the Army,” Flores continued. “If you are moving on to a new chapter outside the military, it will give you an additional step towards whatever goals you have moving forward.”

    Flores also stressed the importance of taking advantage of whatever options are available within reenlistment when they come available, as they are not always going to be available.

    Master Sgt. Humberto Flores, the senior career counselor for 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), discusses career options with Soldiers from the 13th ESC and 4th Sustainment Brigade during a retention briefing at the 13th ESC Soldier and Family Readiness Center March 22. The briefing featured subjects such as future possibilities for the Soldiers ability to reenlist, reenlistment options available for various occupational specialties, and different benefits available to Soldiers dependant on the options they choose. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Thompson, 13th ESC PAO)

    “For example, for the MOS ‘88M’ (motor transport operator) there are only 45 slots in the entire 13th ESC we can reenlist to stay,” explained Flores referencing the Commander’s Allocation Process which allows commanders to retain a limited number of Soldiers serving in an over strength MOS or skill level. “However, once those available slots are filled, Soldiers with that MOS will be required to either reclass or get out.”

    Flores went on to say that if anyone had any additional questions or needed clarification, the best source for information would be to meet with the Soldier’s career counselor.

    The Soldiers in attendance were presented with a lot of information and many walked away with more clarity as to the options available to them.

    “There was a lot of great information that was put out that I was not completely aware of,” said Spc. Pedro Perez, an automated logistics specialist with the 289th Quartermaster Company, 553rd Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 4th Sust. Bde., 13th ESC, who said he was in the process of discussing his options with his Family, and had not yet decided if he was to reenlist. “It’s good to see exactly what all my options are and it’ll help me decide on what my future holds.”

  • Story by Capt. Monika Comeaux, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) Public Affairs Officer

    When Finance and Personnel Services Battalions were taken out of the inventory as part of the Army’s Modularity transformation, the only battalion these officers could compete to command for were in the immaterial Special Troops Battalion Operations, Recruiting and Training Battalions in the US Army Training and Doctrine Command. (TRADOC).  Until Fiscal Year 2012, finance (FI) and adjutant general (AG) officers were not given the opportunity to command special troop’s battalions in sustainment brigades.  

    Lt. Col. Angelia Holbrook, the commander of 4th Special Troops Battalion in the 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) is the first AG officer who was selected to command in an “O1D” (Finance or AG)-coded position, taking command of her formation in January of 2012.

    Lt. Col. Angelia Holbrook, the commander of 4th Special Troops Battalion in the 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary),  addresses the “pack” of Wolfpack Nation February 22, 2013. Holbrook is the first AG officer who selected to command in an “O1D” (Finance or AG)-coded position, taking command of her formation in January of 2012.  U.S. Army photo by 1st Lt. Hope Herring, 4th STB Unit Public Affairs Representative

    “I believe AG and Finance officers have all the right skill sets to succeed in command of STBs in sustainment brigades and can attest to that from my first-hand experience,” said the 4th Sust. Bde. Commander Col. Mark Simerly. “While it is very helpful to have their functional experience in leading the human resources and finance units in the brigade, I believe that we can also expect AG and FI STB commanders to have the entire core competencies required to accomplish the challenging requirements of a battalion command.”

    “I believe good leaders should be allowed to command regardless of branch,” said Capt. Rock Aaron Stevens, the commander of the 207th Signal Company, 4th STB, one of Holbrook’s company commanders.

    When Holbrook found out about her selection, the commandant of the AG School at the time called her in to congratulate her and told her: “Now don’t screw this up Holbrook, because you are the first one. If you screw up, the folks behind you won’t get the chance,” she recalled.

    Holbrook commands approximately 1450 Soldiers. In her current task organization she has a headquarters and headquarters company, a signal company, a financial management company, three truck companies and four movement control teams, she said.

    Because of the Army’s modular structure, her companies and the companies of her fellow battalion commanders in the sustainment brigade deploy independently. Accordingly, they are all at various stages of the Army Force Generation (ARFORGEN) cycle. Holbrook says that she is partly to blame for her high personnel numbers; when she was the personnel officer (G1) of her now higher command, the 13th ESC., during a previous assignment, she was part of the group that developed the plan called ‘Provider Shift.’ This system realigns ‘orphaned’ companies of battalions when their parent battalion headquarters deploy.

    “You don’t look like an STB in a brigade combat team or an STB in some other formation, because you are constantly changing your formation…You inherit their children or their units or you give over yours when it is time for you to go,” Holbrook said.

    Stevens thinks that some of the challenges of a Sust. Bde. STB command comes from the fact that “none of the companies have the same mission and an STB commander must find a way to leverage the unique capabilities of each company to build a cohesive team.”

    To get companies close to fully manned and ready to deploy, there is a constant movement of individuals between the companies in order to ensure whoever is nest in the ARFORGEN cycle is fully manned for their deployment.

     “Sustainment units don’t habitually get manned at the same level as BCTs, based on the HQDA manning priorities,” Holbrook said. “You do a lot of cross leveling; you borrow from Peter to get Paul out the door.  One of the biggest challenges of ARFORGEN in a Sustainment Brigade is manning. Equipping is not so hard, but manning is definitely a challenge.”

    Part of her manning challenges comes from having a 25-30 percent non-availability rate in her unit. “As a human resource manager I had been focused solely on getting units ready to go, making sure their manning was sufficient. And while I knew that the non-available population had been growing during the global war on terror, I  did not realize what that looked like at a battalion level,” Holbrook said. “It means there are less people rowing on the boat and it is affecting our ability to get the job done.” As a company commander, or even as a division strength manger, the commonly accepted average before 9/11 was around 10 percent, she added.

    It was also a surprise to her how long it took to get some of the non-available Soldiers back into the fight, transition them to a warrior transition unit or get them through a medical board process.

    Holbrook said that battalion command was her first job where she felt she brought something to the table from day one. “When I was told ‘hey, you are going to command an STB in an SB,’ I thought to myself, I can do that, I know what it looks like.” [but] “It does not mean I knew how to do everything perfectly.”

    Holbrook had the opportunity to hold the same or similar jobs that multifunctional logisticians do as they go through their officer career progression, such as company commander, battalion executive officer or maintenance officer. She also had the chance to do strength management and the typical “S1 - G1” human resources (HR) jobs. She held these positions with various types of units at the tactical, operational and strategic level.

    Lt. Col. Angelia Holbrook, the commander of 4th Special Troops Battalion in the 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) (right),  poses for a photo with her friend and that time battalion commander Col. Patty Collins, after racing in the Austin Muddy Buddy Series during the spring of 2012. Courtesy Photo

    “Her understanding of human resource administration at the Army level based upon her time at Human Resources Command and as a G1 has been a tremendous asset,” said Simerly. “Angie immediately established herself as the subject matter expert on all human resource matters in the brigade and her leadership of our human resources company significantly improved our ability to provide human resources support at Fort Hood and in deployed settings.  Of course, she has been an outstanding source of personnel and administrative advice for all leaders in the brigade, myself included,” said Simerly.  

     “I really think the reason why I can do well in the sustainment community is because I have previously been in the sustainment community,” Holbrook said. “…you are usually the lone subject matter expert as an AG officer in a unit, so when you go in a new unit you need to learn to speak the language of the type of command you are in.  It just makes you a little bit more value added to the organization if you already have situational awareness of how things work.”

    Holbrook is a firm believer that it is the battalion commander’s responsibility to groom future company commanders and leaders in general. She spends a lot of time with her lieutenants, conducts physical fitness with them. She and her command sergeant major came up with a platoon leader and a squad leader certification process.

    “When it comes to the platoon leaders, the things I want to do is set the conditions to make them good company commanders. So what are the things company commanders have to deal with? They deal with property so [as a platoon leader] you get to be a financial liability investigation officer.” Holbrook also expects all of her platoon leaders to run a range and conduct all the training leading up to it. They also have to be licensed on the vehicle they are tank commanders (TC) in. The battalion has a preventive maintenance checks and services (PMCS) certification program, ran by the battalion maintenance officer (BMO), which lieutenants must go through.

    Not only does she train her officers but she also allows them ample space to train their subordinates. “She protects her companies from training distracters and enables her commanders to develop technically and tactically proficient Soldiers,” said Stevens.

    “We're a family,” Stevens added. “Each unit helps one another out with training and resources to create high-impact training opportunities. We don't have any "spotlight rangers;" everyone is working towards making the battalion successful because of our dedication to her… She provides sound guidance and mentorship…she commands with an open mind to suggestions, willing to incorporate the ideas of her subordinates to improve the organization and foster a creative, problem-solving environment.”

    Recently Holbrook implemented her “Operation Battalion Scramble,” during which, she swapped personnel in key leadership positions among all the companies for a week. She did not change more than two leaders in any company, to keep the company running but obtain the desired effect at the same time: ‘the grass is not necessarily greener on the other side.’

    As for her advice for those who want to follow in her footsteps, commanding a Sust. Bde.  STB with an AG or Finance background, Holbrook shared the following:

    “It is important for everybody to get well-rounded in the technical side of what they do.  But if that was the only thing I could bring to the table here, I don’t think I would be effective. You have to have that common operating picture of the various branches and what each brings to the equation. Leadership is about influence, it is not about how much I know as an HR person. How can I influence my commanders?  Through clear guidance, through personal example through training, through coaching, how can I do that to accomplish the mission that we have been given? …Those who want to command a battalion need to see the Army from all levels.  They should. Look for opportunities to get in and around the tactical level, the operational level and the strategic level as well. ..Get as much breadth of experience as you can.”

    “Ultimately, success as a battalion commander is about leadership, not specific skill sets…” said Simerly. “In addition to the tremendous developmental experience they [FI and AG officers] gain in commanding a battalion, commanding an STB provides them with a broad education in all sustainment functions and thus enhances their future value to the Army.  An STB commander must rapidly master not only the functions of their base branch but must also be multi-functional due to the multitude of tasks a STB commander is asked to perform.

    If Holbrook did not get this command position, she would probably be sitting in a cubicle at HRC, managing a branch, she said. “Command is a great privilege, it is a heavy privilege.”  She grew so close to her staff, commanders and fellow battalion commanders, that she will have a heavy heart when she will leave command. “I better wear waterproof mascara on the change of command day, because I am sure that I will shed some tears. It will be a Class III leak if you will,” she said smiling.

    According to Holbrook, the Army does not yet have plans to open up sustainment brigade commands to AG or Finance officers, but she hopes to see that happen soon.

    “It was a big leap for the logisticians to open 16 billets…but you can understand, if you want to grow this population of officers to command these types of units you have to bring them through certain gates,” Holbrook said. “I do believe that perhaps a portion of the sustainment brigades one day should be commanded by a Finance or AG officers.  There are five stars on the CASCOM patch; AG and Finance are two of them.”

  • Fifty-two Soldiers assigned to the 49th Transportation Battalion, 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), are scheduled to be honored in a redeployment ceremony at 6:30 a.m. March 27. The Soldiers are returning from a deployment to Afhanistan for which they left in July 2012.

    For media members who wish to attend, please RSVP no later than 9 p.m. March 26 to SFC Gibson, 4th Sustainment Brigade Public Affairs Office, joel.f.gibson.mil@mail.mil or 617-956-2767(cellphone number, use if after 5 p.m or if you don't receive a confirmation email). Gate time for the ceremony will be March 27 at 5:00 a.m. in order to provide ample time.

  • The 4th Sustainment Brigade, 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, will host its annual Easter Egg Hunt for hundreds of Families at the Clear Creek Softball Complex Saturday, March 23.

    Volunteers stuffed more than 20,000 eggs for the event, which will also feature various competitions and activities for the children with each of the stations being manned and sponsored by a subordinate unit. 

    Media interested in covering the event should contact Capt. Monika Comeaux, public affairs officer for 13th ESC, at monika.comeaux.mil@mail.mil or 254-288-7342 no later than 12 p.m. Thursday, March 21.

    Gate time for the event will be 9:15 a.m. on Saturday. Members of the media should meet at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center's designated media parking area.