Fort Hood News Archive

By Gloria Montgomery, CRDAMC Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas–The Graduate Medical Education (GME) Program, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, held a graduation ceremony for GME residents here June 21.

Nineteen Army officers graduated from their respective residency and fellowship programs Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine, Family Medicine Obstetrics Fellowship and the U.S. Army Graduate Program in Anesthesia Nursing.

CRDAMC Graduate Medical Education (GME) trains and educates the next generation of healthcare providers, teaching them to provide compassionate, world-class healthcare, one patient at a time. GME provides interns, residents and fellows evidence-based didactics, hands on and direct patient care in a patient-rich environment with the support of a broad-based subspecialty medical campus.

Guest speaker for the ceremony was Brig. Gen. Jeffrey J. Johnson, commanding general, Army Medicine Regional Health Command-Central, who reflected on the challenges and expectations of the new graduates as both officers and physicians.

“Our nation is quite fortunate you have chosen to wear the uniform of a Soldier and are graduating from a renowned graduate medical education training program like CRDAMC,” Johnson said, encouraging them to reflect on the significance of their graduation as they move forward in their careers.  “They’ll be challenging times where you will need folks to lean into you. Make sure you take care of those relationships as you continue to move forward.”

Johnson emphasized their success in both the Army and military medicine correlates to how they inspire others, embrace change and trust the Army’s senior noncommissioned officers (NCO).

“To be a good leader you must cultivate an attitude of humility, interpersonal tact and empathy,” the Family Medicine physician said, stressing putting others before self. “This is not only how you will function as a leader but those same traits will make you incredible physicians whether it’s at the bedside or at the table.”

A medical health-care provider who lacks those leadership attributes, Johnson stressed, could contribute to poor patient outcomes like “extended stays, improper care, incorrect use of prescribed medication and excessive repeat visits to an emergency department.”

“Unfortunately many aspiring leaders only think and talk about what they believe is important without considering the motivation and the perspective of others,” he said. “That’s not a good path and it’s not good leadership.”

Johnson, reminded the graduates who will begin their new journey at military medical facilities worldwide, that leadership is a continuing trial and error learning process and to not be afraid of failure.

“Those are the ones that have stayed with me and spurred me to do the right thing the next time,” he said. “Great patient care is great leadership, and we owe it to our patients and our staffs to be better leaders.”

As military treatment facilities merge into the Defense Health Agency, Johnson told the graduates to embrace change.

“We all know change is inevitable, but that’s exactly what we need to do to continue moving forward in our changing environment. Change always comes with an opportunity to succeed and, sometime, forage a new and a better plan than what we had before,” he said, adding that transitioning toward a more integrated healthcare system will require “the stepping out of our comfort zones as we explore new opportunities, new integrations and the readiness that will be cultivated throughout our organization.”

One valuable resource every Army officer needs to rely on are the senior NCOs, whom Johnson said are the differentiating factor that separates the military from all the rest of the medical profession.

“NCOs have incredible wisdom to share, and most importantly, it comes from a completely different perspective than yours,” he said, stressing that some of the best lessons he learned during his early career were from his NCOs. “I wasn’t always ready to hear what they had to say, but now, as I look back, it was very important, and it was exactly what I needed to hear.”

Johnson also reminded them of their role in Army Medicine.

“Technology and standards are changing, and we need people like you to understand them and chart the way of the future,” he said. “I’m confident that Army Medicine is very strong and has a strong future with each of you as you are about ready to join our ranks.

His final charge to the graduates reflected on mentoring.

“As you have been mentored and will continue to be mentored through your career, always find an opportunity to return the favor and to be a mentor to men and women of all ranks and all stages of life who are attempting to follow in your footsteps,” he said.

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From left, Lt. Col. Drew Baird, director, Family Medicine Residency program, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, congratulates Capt. Kathrn Oppenlander during ceremonies for graduate education residents, held June 21 at Club Hood. Captain Oppenlander, who graduated from CRDAMC’s three-year Family Medicine Residency program, was one of 19 Soldiers awarded their diplomas in residency programs that also included Family Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine Obstetric Fellowship and Anesthesia Nursing. Guest speaker for the ceremony was Brig. Gen. Jeffrey J. Johnson. Commanding general, Army Medicine Regional Health command-Central. (U.S. Army photo by Gloria Montgomery, CRDAMC Public Affairs)

 

FORT HOOD, Texas – Fort Hood’s Independence Day Celebration is set for 4 to 10 p.m. July 4 in Hood Stadium located behind the Community Events Center.

Activities include H-E-B Cart Races, children’s inflatables and live entertainment with the country band opener “The Band Steele” and headliner pop/rock artist Andy Grammer.

The celebration concludes in a 30-minute fireworks display choreographed to patriotic music. The fireworks show is expected to begin at 9:30 p.m. Fireworks are paid by profits from the Fort Hood recycling program.

The Independence Day Celebration is a free event and open to the public. Food and alcohol vendors will be available, as well.

Members of the general public in privately owned vehicles must enter and exit Clear Creek Gate (through the left visitors’ lane for access) or obtain a pass from the Marvin Leath Visitors Center. Drivers and passengers 18 and older must have a valid photo ID.

A priority parking area will be open to all DoD card holders (first come, first served) as well as a general public parking area open to all (first come, first served). Both parking sites will be at the stadium.

On-post shuttles also will be running approximately every 15 minutes from 3 to 11 p.m. All individuals utilizing the bus service under the age of 18 must be accompanied by an adult.
A complete list of activities and shuttle stops can be found at http://hood.armymwr.com/calendar.

Prohibited items include rucksacks, explosive weapons, firearms, knives, clubs, brass knuckles, glass containers (except baby bottles), pets, alcohol, fireworks, pop-up/canopy tents. Texas concealed and open carry of firearms do not apply on Fort Hood.

Permitted items are backpacks (will be searched), strollers, coolers (for baby formula), camelbacks (will be searched), umbrellas, blankets, lawn chairs, small wagons, cameras, video recorders/camcorders and service animals (guide dogs, etc.).

Media interested in attending the Independence Day Celebration should register here and meet media escorts at the south-side parking lot across from the visitors’ center. Media escorts will be available for media pick up at 4:30 p.m. Media can film up to the first two minutes of the opening band The Band Steele at 6:30 p.m. Andy Grammer has not approved filming of his concert.

UPDATE: Fort Hood to conduct dignified transfer ceremony

Fort Hood officials will conduct a dignified transfer ceremony (ramp ceremony) in honor of Sgt. James Gregory Johnston at 11:45 a.m. July 5 at the North Ramp located on Robert Gray Army Airfield.

The ramp ceremony, or fallen comrade ceremony, is a solemn event marking the journey home of a fallen U.S. service member.

Johnston died June 25 in Uruzgan Province, Afghanistan, as a result of wounds sustained from small arms fire while engaged in combat operations.

Media desiring to attend the event must register here no later than 4 p.m. July 3.

On July 5, a public affairs representative will meet media at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center located on TJ Mills Blvd. at 10 a.m. for an escort to the ceremony.

 

Sgt. James G. Johnston, explosive ordnance disposal specialist, 79th Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal)

FORT HOOD, Texas – The Department of Defense announced June 27 the death of a Fort Hood Soldier who was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

Sgt. James Gregory Johnston, 24, whose home of record is listed as Trumansburg, New York, was assigned to 79th Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), 71st Ordnance Group, here since February.

Johnston, along with another Soldier, Master Sgt. Micheal B. Riley, died June 25 in Uruzgan Province, Afghanistan, as a result of wounds sustained from small arms fire while engaged in combat operations.

“It is with a heavy heart that we mourn the passing of Sergeant James Johnston.  He was the epitome of what we as Soldiers all aspire to be: intelligent, trained, always ready.  We will honor his service and his sacrifice to this nation as we continue to protect others from explosive hazards around the world,” said Lt. Col. Stacy M. Enyeart, commander of 79th Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal).

Johnston entered active-duty military service in July 2013 as an explosive ordnance disposal specialist.

Johnston deployed in support of Operation Freedom’s Sentinel in March 2019.

Johnston’s awards and decorations include a Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Korea Defense Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon, Combat Action Badge, Senior Explosive Ordnance Disposal Badge and Explosive Ordnance Badge.

The incident remains under investigation by the Department of Defense.

Sgt. James. G. Johnston

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By Patricia Deal, CRDAMC Public Affairs

FORT HOOD, Texas–Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center said goodbye to one commander and welcomed its newest leader in a change of command ceremony on Sadowski Field, outside the III Corps Headquarters here June 28.

Col. Richard Malish assumed command from Col. David Gibson, who led the hospital for the last two years. Gibson will be retiring after serving 33 years.

Gibson’s tenure as hospital commander began just a year after the new 947,000 square foot, state-of-the-art hospital began seeing patients.  Gibson faced many challenges during his time as commander, but his focus and leadership skills contributed to CRDAMC’s numerous accomplishments.

In his opening remarks, Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Johnson, commander of Regional Health Command Central, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, praised Gibson for setting the bar high and exceeding expectations over and over.

“Col. Gibson’s accomplishments come down to the ability to pinpoint a problem, work out the most effective and direct way to address it and then focus his people’s efforts and resources to accomplish the mission,” Johnson said. “His accomplishments are monumental and highlight his leadership skills, hard work and diligence. Gibson and his team at Darnall have elevated the level of care here to an unprecedented standard.”

Johnson highlighted the milestones CRDAMC achieved under Gibson’s leadership to include sustaining medical readiness rates above 90 percent, increasing hospital productivity by $53 million and earning recognition as being number one in surgical quality and safety within the DoD.

In his farewell speech, Gibson thanked his “team of teams” for their efforts in achieving the many success over the last two years.

“I spent my time and energy defining and communicating desired results, coaching and empowering leaders at all levels, but they did all the heavy lifting. They delivered all the tremendous results,” he said.

Malish comes to CRDAMC from the Office of the Army Surgeon General where he served as the deputy chief of staff for Quality and Safety. He is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology and has served in a variety of medical leadership assignments in garrison and in the operational theater throughout his career.

Malish said he is honored to take command of this “fabulous facility and its noble mission.” During his command, CRDAMC will continue to support the Fort Hood mission and its community, but the source of that support will change from the Army to the Defense Health Agency, he added.

“This change brings the opportunity for the creation of something new. We must assume well-considered risk and dare to achieve the incredible promise this historic change offers us. Let us create new laws and a new system of health with a capability deserved by our modern force,” he said.

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Incoming Commander Col. Richard Malish receives the guidon from Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Johnson, commander of Regional Health Command Central, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, signifying his assumption of command during a ceremony at Fort Hood June 28. (U.S. Army photo by Patricia Deal, CRDAMC Public Affairs)
Col. David Gibson, CRDAMC’s outgoing commander; Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Johnson, commander of Regional Health Command Central, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston and incoming Commander Col. Richard Malish render honors during CRDAMC’s change of command ceremony at Fort Hood June 28. (U.S. Army photo by Patricia Deal, CRDAMC Public Affairs)
(U.S. Army photo by Patricia Deal, CRDAMC Public Affairs)

FORT HOOD, Texas– In advance celebration of the Medical Service Corps’ official 102nd anniversary on June 30, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center Commander Col. David Gibson (center) and fellow MSC officers Lt. Col. Tony Marinos, Capt.  Kandice Reyes and Col. Randy Dorsey slice through a cake during a ceremony at the hospital June 27. Established in 1947, the Medical Service Corps is composed of medical, administrative, scientific, and provider specialties ranging from the management and support of the Army’s health services system to direct patient care. Its mission is providing Army Medicine with a diverse and multidisciplinary team of professionals who “strengthen the Military Health System through responsive and reliable clinical, scientific, and administrative services across the full spectrum of conflict as part of the Joint Force.”

FORT HOOD, Texas — Fort Hood’s Directorate of Family, Morale, Welfare and Recreation will host the sixth annual Run for Remembrance 5K Run/Walk at 7 a.m. June 29 beginning on Sadowski Field to honor our nation’s fallen service members.

More than 7,000 combat boots will line the route which memorializes service members from the five services who have lost their lives since September 11, 2001.

“It is a great event to bring the community together to honor those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice,” said Col. Jason Wesbrock, commander, U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Hood.   “It is also a very humbling reminder of the cost our nation’s sons and daughters have paid for our freedom.”

After the run/walk, the boots along with a photo of each of the fallen will be on display 24/7 at Sadowski Field in front of the III Corps Headquarters building through July 7.

The event is free and open to all, however, registration is still required through Fort Hood’s DFMWR website to participate in the run/walk.  Any non-DoD identification cardholders who want to take part in the run/walk or just view the boot display, must obtain a visitor pass at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center located on T.J. Mills Blvd.

Media who wish to cover this event, should register here. For more information, media may contact the Fort Hood Public Affairs office at (254) 287-0106/9993.  A Public Affairs representative will meet the media at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center at 6:30 a.m. June 29 for an escort onto post.

 

 

Sgt. James G. Johnston, explosive ordnance disposal specialist, 79th Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal)

FORT HOOD, Texas – The Department of Defense announced June 27 the death of a Fort Hood Soldier who was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

Sgt. James Gregory Johnston, 24, whose home of record is listed as Trumansburg, New York, was assigned to 79th Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), 71st Ordnance Group, here since February.

Johnston, along with another Soldier, Master Sgt. Micheal B. Riley, died June 25 in Uruzgan Province, Afghanistan, as a result of wounds sustained from small arms fire while engaged in combat operations.

“It is with a heavy heart that we mourn the passing of Sergeant James Johnston.  He was the epitome of what we as Soldiers all aspire to be: intelligent, trained, always ready.  We will honor his service and his sacrifice to this nation as we continue to protect others from explosive hazards around the world,” said Lt. Col. Stacy M. Enyeart, commander of 79th Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal).

Johnston entered active-duty military service in July 2013 as an explosive ordnance disposal specialist.

Johnston deployed in support of Operation Freedom’s Sentinel in March 2019.

Johnston’s awards and decorations include a Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Army Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Korea Defense Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon, Combat Action Badge, Senior Explosive Ordnance Disposal Badge and Explosive Ordnance Badge.

The incident remains under investigation by the Department of Defense.

Sgt. James. G. Johnston

Fort Hood’s Directorate of Family, Morale, Welfare and Recreation will host “Rockin’ Fest” 9 a.m.-noon June 29 at Bronco Youth Center here. The event is free and open to the public.

Festivities will include: Face painting, arts and crafts, games, music, bounce and water inflatables, child safety demos and free food while supplies last.

Non-DoD identification card holders must obtain a visitors access pass at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center.

Media who wish to cover this event, should register here by 4 p.m. June 28. On June 29, media should meet public affairs representatives at the Marvin Leath Visitors Center at 9:30 a.m. here.

 

FORT HOOD, Texas — Soldiers and Families can attend a free advanced screening of Hazel Blue Productions’ “I Am That Man,” followed by a question-and-answer session with director and star Matthew Marsden at the Palmer Theater here.

Marsden stars as John Beckett, a former Navy SEAL trying to reintegrate into civilian life when his close friend is murdered. Beckett calls upon his specialized military skills to find the perpetrators and bring them to justice. The film is rated R, which is suitable for those under 17 years of age only when accompanied by an adult.

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service screening will be held at 6 p.m. June 29 at the Palmer Theater, Bldg. 334, 31st Street. The Q&A session will immediately follow the screening. Marsden’s previous film credits include “Black Hawk Down” and “Resident Evil: Extinction.”

“The Exchange is thrilled to provide this free opportunity to Soldiers and families not only to enjoy this film, but also to meet the star and director and ask questions about the making of a movie,” said Exchange General Manager Daniel Wise.

Authorized patrons can get free tickets at the “Reel Time” Palmer Theater, the Exchange food court or the Exchange main store customer service. For more information, contact the Fort Hood Palmer Theater at (254) 287-3851.

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AAFES: Since 1895, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service (Exchange) has gone where Soldiers, Airmen and their families go to improve the quality of their lives by providing valued goods and services at exclusive military pricing. The Exchange is the 61st-largest retailer in the United States. Its earnings provided $2.3 billion in dividends to support military morale, welfare and recreation programs over the last 10 years. The Exchange is a non-appropriated fund entity of the Department of Defense and is directed by a Board of Directors. The Exchange is a 50th Anniversary Vietnam War Commemorative Partner, planning and conducting events and activities that recognize the service, valor and sacrifice of Vietnam Veterans and their families in conjunction with the United States of America Vietnam War Commemoration. To find out more about the Exchange history and mission or to view recent press releases please visit our website at http://www.ShopMyExchange.com or follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ExchangePAO.

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Media Notes:

For more information or to schedule an interview with an Exchange representative please contact Marisa Wolfe at (214) 312-5111 or wolfema@aafes.com.

Follow the Exchange:
Facebook:  www.facebook.com/shopmyexchange
Twitter:  https://twitter.com/shopmyexchange
Instagram: @shopmyexchange

Follow I Am That Man:
OFFICIAL WEBSITE: www.IAmThatManMovie.com
OFFICIAL FACEBOOK: @IATMMovie
OFFICIAL INSTAGRAM: #iamthatmanmovie

FORT HOOD, Texas – Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center will host a change of command ceremony at 8:30 a.m., Friday, June 28 at Sadowski Field marking the transfer of leadership from Col. David R. Gibson to Col. Richard G. Malish.

Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Johnson, Commanding General, Regional Health Command – Central will serve as the reviewing officer for the ceremony.

Col. Malish previously served as the Army Surgeon General’s Deputy Chief of Staff for Quality and Safety. Malish is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University and earned his Doctor of Medicine degree from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Cardiology.

Media interested in covering this event should call CRDAMC Public Affairs at (254) 553-6218 or (254) 338-6087 by 4 p.m. Thursday, June 27 for gate time.

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For more information contact:

Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center
Public Affairs Office
(254) 288-8005
Mikaela Cade
Fort Hood, TX 76544
mikaela.t.cade.civ@mail.mil